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Summary:

Online advertising network Chitika has tracked where new iPads are being activated and has surfaced some interesting demographic data as to where these early third-generation iPad adopters live within in Apple’s largest market, the U.S. The short answer is: mostly coastal states.

tim cook new ipad

Apple sold 3 million new iPads the first weekend they went on sale in March, and has probably sold a few million more since then. So who are these people that pre-order or wait in line outside a store to be the first people to show off their shiny new device to their friends and family? Online advertising network Chitika has tracked where new iPads are being activated and has surfaced some interesting demographic data as to where these early third-generation iPad adopters live within in Apple’s largest market, the U.S.

The short answer is: mostly coastal states. In its Chitika Insights report, the company says it combined its own data showing new iPad activations — which currently account for 9 percent of all iPad traffic on its ad network — with U.S. Census bureau data. It found:

  • The top five areas with the most newly activated iPad traffic are California, Hawaii, Nevada, Washington D.C. and Washington state.
  • Those states (and district) — not coincidentally — are considered states of high median income levels, according to census data.
  • By categorizing them in categories of either “coastal” or “inland,” Chitika learned that residents of coastal states are purchasing activating new iPads at a higher rate than their inland brethren.
  • The median income in coastal states is 10 percent higher than that of inland states.

The conclusion, that people with more money are the ones rushing out the door to buy the latest tablet tech from Apple, isn’t that surprising. Obviously people who have extra discretionary spending money lying around can afford to buy gadgets that go for a minimum of $500.

Interestingly, this data pretty much mirrors what we learned about Apple’s customers in its second-largest market, China. Last week a research firm counted up the owners of all 21 million iPads and iPhones in China and found the highest concentration of those devices were in the country’s rich, coastal, heavily industrialized areas.

  1. Jonathan Pilley Wednesday, April 18, 2012

    Aren’t those also states with higher populations?

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  2. Not nearly as sensational but isn’t a better description “populated states” rather than rich?

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  3. I think the real metric would have been the average income of the iPad owners in these coastal states vs average income of iPad owners in other states. That would have told whether rich people or buying or rich ‘states’ are buying

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  4. Thanks for sharing this information, Erica. You’re right- it makes sense that people from coastal states have been buying the most iPads in the U.S., considering those are the wealthier states in the country. It is interesting that the data from China’s iPad purchases data practically mirrors the data for the U.S. Now that the iPad has been recently released in 13 more countries, I’m curious to see whether we will see similar results elsewhere.

    Alyssa
    Mosaic Technology
    http://mosaictec.com

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  5. Travis Stephens Wednesday, April 18, 2012

    That’s not coastal states. That’s everywhere but the midwest. Nobody lives in the midwest.

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  6. Yeah, I agree with earlier comments. These numbers should have been measured against population density as well as by state. The map on this page pretty much matches this map of U.S. population density: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_U.S._states_by_population_density

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  7. Flash…NEWS BULLETIN…Erica OMG reports water is WET.

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  8. There are 28 highlighted states on the map. 15 are coastal and 13 are inland. I suppose that one could say that qualifies as ‘mostly.’

    Note: AZ is not coastal no matter how it looks on this map, lol.

    Also, “Hello” from CO!

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  9. Well, duh, 90% of the U.S. population lives within 100 miles of a coastline, so this statistic makes complete sense.

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  10. This looks like a “fairness” issue that Obama will need to address.

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