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Summary:

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Richard Russo, one of the newest additions to the PaidContent 2012 lineup, will talk about the changing publishing landscape, including how authors are affected by the battle over e-book pricing,

Pulitzer Prize-winning author
photo: Elena Seibert

What does the Justice Department’s lawsuit against Apple, Penguin, Macmillan, Hachette, Simon & Schuster and HarperCollins mean for authors? Richard Russo, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Empire Falls, will talk about that and much more at paidContent 2012: At The Crossroads, including his decision to publish his upcoming collection of short stories only in print, and how e-books and consolidation are changing the dynamics on the creative side of publishing.

Russo isn’t anti e-book, but he has been outspoken about his concerns over Amazon’s low-price strategy and the effect it can have on bookstores (his daughter is a bookseller). He’s a new member of The Authors Guild board, working with Scott Turow and others to lobby publicly about this and other issues.

From his op-ed in The New York Times reacting to the Amazon holiday offer to beat bricks-and-mortar prices:

Nearly two years ago, the Macmillan publishing group adopted a new sales model that would cost Macmillan in the short run, but allow other companies to enter or remain in the e-book market without having to take a loss on every sale. Amazon’s response to more competition? They refused to sell not merely Macmillan’s e-books, but nearly every physical book Macmillan published. Amazon eventually backed down, but its initial response helped shape a widespread sense that it envisions a world in which there will be no other booksellers or publishers, a world where, history suggests, Amazon may not use its power benignly or for the benefit of literary culture.

Now Macmillan is one of the publishers being sued by the U.S. government — and CEO John Sargent is already promising a big fight.

We’ll also explore other facets of the changing publishing landscape at paidContent 2012, including how some are using the combination of low-cost technology, the influx of new reading devices and social marketing to challenge the Macmillans of the word for reader money and attention. Book publishing isn’t just for publishers anymore.

Register today to join us at The TimesCenter in New York on May 23rd for paidContent 2012 and take part in a day-long conversation about the best ways to create, distribute and make money from content. The full list of confirmed speakers is here, with more to come. If you’re interested in sponsoring the event, please contact eventsales@gigaom.com.

Register for paidContent 2012 in New York, NY on Eventbrite

  1. Hey publishing, like Napster visionary Sean Fanning once said; “Again it’s adapt or die.” the negative PR perception you are facing is to Amazons benefit and the publishing worlds detriment.

    $10 e-books is a fair price for a completely virtual product that faces none of the costs of the real world counterpart.

    The mobile telecom and cable providers make me pay for their greed so I will be damned if I am going to subscribe to yours. I will boycott your retail world and find the content elsewhere!

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