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Summary:

Samsung’s Galaxy Nexus is a Verizon Wireless exclusive in the U.S. but Sprint customers may be able to get the device next month. Although Sprint’s 4G LTE network isn’t available yet, the phone will keep the LTE radio for future activation and likely support Google Wallet.

Samsung Galaxy Nexus

Samsung’s Galaxy Nexus has been a Verizon Wireless exclusive in the U.S., but Sprint customers may be able to get the device next month. Robert Herron reports on the S4GRU blog that Sprint will launch the Android 4.0 handset on April 15. Although Sprint’s 4G LTE network isn’t available yet, the phone will ship with an LTE radio ready for future activation.

Sprint hasn’t shared any official news on the Galaxy Nexus, but it makes sense that the carrier will sell the handset. It’s a flagship model that offers a large 1280 x 720 resolution touchscreen, dual-core processor and Google’s newest version of Android. Since Samsung already makes an LTE version for Verizon, it shouldn’t prove to difficult to make one for Sprint that uses a different radio frequency.

One key difference I anticipate is full support for Google Wallet, which I find to be a superb way to pay for things with my own Galaxy Nexus; I ordered an unlocked GSM version of the device late last year. Sprint previously partnered with Google to make use of the NFC chip in the Nexus S handset for the Wallet service. The Galaxy Nexus also has NFC-capability and it works well. Verizon’s Galaxy Nexus doesn’t officially support Google Wallet, mainly because the carrier is a joint partner with AT&T and T-Mobile for a competing payment service called Isis.

Sprint was the first major U.S. carrier to move beyond traditional 3G mobile broadband, partnering with Clearwire to build out a WiMAX network which launched in 2008. Other carriers eventually settled on the more global LTE standard, however, and Sprint plans to pursue the same path. The carrier plans to launch LTE on its 1900 MHz spectrum by mid-2012 and at that time, I’d expect the Galaxy Nexus handsets will be able to use it.

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  1. James Johnson Monday, March 19, 2012

    Well, looks like I will keep Sprint and invest in the Galaxy Nexus and see how it does–I just hope that Sprint’s LTE is able to at least match or surpass Verizon’s LTE newtwork(although very unlikely. Just having 3G EVD0 is better then 4G WiMax–seeing that I currently have the EVO 3D, and I don’t get very good 4G where I live and it’s slow and Spotty, I am ready to give Sprint another chance–This is a very exciting time to be a cell phone shopper, and google wallet is another selling point that I think will really help both Sprint and Samsung gain a lot of customers; me for one am excited for it’s release, and will be upgrading from my EVO 3D once it is available for sale.

    1. James, one quick thought since you mentioned Sprint and Verizon; Verizon is using 700 MHz for LTE while Sprint will use 1900 MHz. That means indoors, Verizon’s network will have a stronger signal; all things being equal. The lower the frequency, the better it can get through walls and such. Just an FYI for you….

      1. sprint is also going to launch in the 800 or 700 band as well after iDEN is decommissioned but they dont have enough bandwidth to set up a large enough channel to compare to Verizon or Att
        they will be slower but by 10-40% depending on where u live.
        thats why they seperately are asking FCC to hold auction bolocking out VZ and ATT so they can widen the channel they plan to open

  2. Kevin, has Sprint indicated if this phone will work globally? I know the Spring Samsung Galaxy S II does not work on a global network, but the HTC phones do. This phone is intriguing to me, however I have not been happy with my Samsung Epic 4G and would rather not stay with Samsung if possible.

    1. maybe since sprint recently has up-ed the World Capable android line (EVO Design and Moto Photon (which i love but the locked bootloader(only important for DEV (making ur phone truly yours by “Hacking it” to do what you want and not what the maker wants) is a down side as with all

      i already got the Photon to use so it dosent matter for me since im going to buy No-contract phone and the best one out on sprint by late summer to mid fall (no iPhone)

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