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Summary:

This was the weekend everyone signed up and joined Highlight or Glancee. TechCrunch has written about it and Robert Scoble has been going on about how viral these location-based services are. No doubt about it, these new apps which run in the background on your phone […]

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This was the weekend everyone signed up and joined Highlight or Glancee. TechCrunch has written about it and Robert Scoble has been going on about how viral these location-based services are. No doubt about it, these new apps which run in the background on your phone and let you know when someone you know (or might like to know) in in your proximity, are going to be all the rage at SouthbySouthwest.

If you don’t know the details of how these services work, read Scoble’s review (The Two Hottest Apps You’ll “Run Into” at SXSW) where he goes into depth on both Highlight and Glancee. These “people discovery apps” (Scoble’s term) have been around before (Sonar and Loopt to name a few) but I would agree with Scoble that the timing is right this year for the early-adopter types descending on Austin next week to take these services to the next level.

I’ve been using both apps for a few weeks and can see how they could be useful while travelling and open to meeting new people. They are especially powerful when there is a compelling reason driving you to make new connections. Trade shows and conferences are a prime venue for this behavior. This was what was on my mind when I was with the MyBlogLog team and we developed our own version of the people discovery app to show off our API at an O’Reilly eTech conference in 2008.

You can read about “Meetspace” on TechCrunch or ReadWriteWeb. It was a small java app that ran on a Blackberry or laptop. It was tied to your YahooID and would pop-up a little notification that another MyBlogLog user was nearby. As Highlight does today, we added a feature that would compare your  profile interests with the other person’s and give you shared interests (“talking points“)  that you could use to strike up a conversation.

Because Meetspace used bluetooth, not GPS, to detect proximity, the range was shorter compared to Highlight and Glancee. This worked to our advantage because, at the conference where we released the app, it allowed us to track when you were in the same room as someone as opposed to in the same general area. We kept a running log of the total time spend in the proximity of others and let users see who they spend the most time with over the course of the conference which usually meant they were the people attending the same tracks as you. Combined that with basic details of their company and interests and you had quite a powerful social networking tool.

Now for the cautionary tale. Meetspace was launched as an experiment. It was designed to show what you could do with the MyBlogLog API and while we didn’t plan on it being a new feature, we thought it might be an interesting way to bring the virtual social network into the physical world if it caught on.

It never had a chance.

Shortly after the eTech conference I received a call from the legal department at Yahoo. I forgot who was on the phone but he basically opened the call with, “You are going to shut Meetspace down, right?” as if it was beyond debate. I gave him my arguments for why we should let it run, (it was opt-in, it was innovative, it helped demonstrate our API) but all this fell on deaf ears.

The trump argument by legal was that if anyone were to be harmed in any way, and if the police were to require discovery to see if anyone else were around while harm was being done, the police could use the Meetspace app as reason to require Yahoo to turn over their user logs. Yahoo did not want to run the risk of having to turn over these logs to the police. End of story. Game over.

Hopefully it’ll be different for Hightlight and Glancee this time around.

Ian Kennedy is a product manager at GigaOM, working on GigaOM Pro. He previously worked at Nokia and Yahoo. This post originally appeared on his personal blog Everwas.

  1. But doesn’t Yahoo sell that data to the police?

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    1. Of course you jest. As you know, Yahoo takes their user privacy very seriously. My point here is that in order to innovate, it’s sometimes necessary to push the boundaries. Such experiments should be acceptable if it’s opt-in. Alas, big companies with institutional shareholders tend to be risk adverse. When the attitude is, “we like to be fast-followers” then you know you’re in the wrong boat.

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  2. Roope Rainisto Monday, March 5, 2012

    Hi Ian, thanks for the article. :)

    Just to check: so even though it ran with Bluetooth, it still used the servers to … what did it use the Yahoo! servers for? Could you have in theory built it without servers?

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    1. Hi Roope,

      Bluetooth was used to read the deviceID for every bluetooth device within range. This was then sent back to the servers which stored a lookup table for everyone that opt’d into the experiment. If my device scanned the room and detected your deviceID and you had opt’d in, the server would then respond and say that you were in the room and pop up your associated MyBlogLog avatar which linked to the profile details.

      I found an old blog post that goes into a bit more detail
      http://everwas.com/2008/03/over-clocking-your-friendships.html

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