Summary:

One month after Apple (NSDQ: AAPL) joined the Fair Labor Association amid the release of its supplier report and a new wave of discomfort ov…

Apple Foxconn Factory Workers
photo: Apple

One month after Apple (NSDQ: AAPL) joined the Fair Labor Association amid the release of its supplier report and a new wave of discomfort over the working conditions in iPhone factories, Apple has announced that Foxconn, its primary supplier, will undergo random audits of its factories starting Monday.

The audits will cover Foxconn facilities in Chengdu and Shenzen, where the first audit was conducted Monday, Apple said in a press release. Foxconn has come under fire several times over the years as people started to learn more about the working conditions endured by those building gear for the entire consume electronics industry, but the pressure intensified in January following two articles published by The New York Times (NYSE: NYT) focusing on Apple and its willingness or unwillingness to use its financial might to change conditions on the ground.

In truth the problem is much more widespread than any one factory or really any one industry, as we’ve argued in the past. But while Apple can’t singlehandedly reverse two decades of global macroeconomic policy, it can continue to hold its suppliers to a higher standard than demanded by the government of the country in which they operate.

The audits will be conducted by the FLA, which counts companies like Nike and Adidas among its members. Apple was the first tech company to join the group, and said the FLA will post the first results of these audits in early March.

Comments have been disabled for this post