Summary:

When Apple first released its free iBooks Author software, some were upset about its end-user licensing agreement, which states that works c…

iBooks Author
photo: Apple

When Apple first released its free iBooks Author software, some were upset about its end-user licensing agreement, which states that works created in the program must be sold exclusively through Apple (NSDQ: AAPL). The company has now tweaked the EULA to make it a bit more clear.

It’s still the case that non-iPad devices won’t support *.ibooks files without some tweaking and converting — which could cause them to lose most of their enhancements, and also is forbidden by the EULA — so the updated license agreement does not really change anything except to possibly make some people a little less mad.

Here’s the new language:

If you want to charge a fee for a work that includes files in the .ibooks format generated using iBooks Author, you may only sell or distribute such work through Apple, and such distribution will be subject to a separate agreement with Apple. This restriction does not apply to the content of such works when distributed in a form that does not include files in the .ibooks format.

And here’s the old language:

If you charge a fee for any book or other work you generate using this software (a “Work”), you may only sell or distribute such Work through Apple (e.g., through the iBookstore) and such distribution will be subject to a separate agreement with Apple.

The new EULA clarifies that Apple does not somehow own the content you create in iBooks Author; it only seeks control over works outputted in the *.ibooks format. So it’s fine for a user to repackage that content into, say, a Kindle book.

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