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Summary:

There’s a perception in Silicon Valley that smart thermostat startup Nest created the world’s first connected thermostat. While the Nest thermostat is gorgeous and potentially a game-changing, there’s dozens of companies that are making smart thermostats and software, and here’s a dozen of them in photos:

Honeywell's thermostat with Opower software

Honeywell's thermostat with Opower software

There’s a perception in Silicon Valley that smart learning thermostat startup Nest created the world’s first connected and digital smart thermostat. While the Nest thermostat is gorgeous and potentially a game-changing, there’s dozens of companies that are making connected smart thermostats.

I snapped a dozen or so photos of some of these thermostat players (see below) at the DistribuTECH smart grid event in San Antonio, Texas this week. It’s clear from the buzz from big box retailers, utilities, startups, telcos and cable companies that 2012 is morphing into a break out year for the smart thermostat. I wrote a report on the battle for the smart thermostat for our premium research service GigaOM Pro (subscription required) this week, which provides an indepth look at the players around the smart thermostat and who I think will come out on top in 2012.

 

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  1. But apparently it’s the only one not framed by an ugly plastic box.

    1. Agreed! The other companies just don’t seem to get that!

  2. The difference with nest, like the other’s have noted is not only the “sex appeal” of the attrative device, but also that nest is approaching the thermostat sales process from a different angle i.e. best buy instead of home depot. Add to that the fact that they’re packaging a complete DIY solution and they’ve fundamentally changed the way consumers look at thermostats.

    1. I’ve been following this space closely for some time. Honeywell’s offering is way better than Nest. Ecobee is interesting too but Honeywell’s is the most practical and useful. Not sexy, just useful.

      1. huh, what about schneider?

      2. Yeah, but is it usable? I don’t want to “program” my thermostat (an unintuitive chore that is far too inflexible to bother on most standard programmable thermostats).

        I’d love to hear the pros/cons of Nest vs. Honeywell in more detail.

      3. Schneider is using the stat from the maker that had the stat certified as a golden unit for ZigBee ® Smart Energy Profile 1.1…So, yes, it works.

      4. What, in detail, does “way better” mean? I’d love for that to actually be true

  3. Well I can say had my nest for a little over 2 months now.. I am not digging it.. I fell in love with the looks and the idea of it learning my comings and goings. Taking care of business and saving me money. Whats not to like. Right?? Well the first week was wild. Nest was changing temp in the middle of the night and blasting heat when the heat was not needed. After 10 days things were better.. However, Nest is still second guessing “MY” temp. settings I set Nest on 70 and it will change to 72 hours later. Whats up with that? Also to pet owners Nest thinks my weimaraner is a person (because of the motion sensor). So if I go out while my dog stays in due to rain or snow or whatever. Nest thinks the heat needs to be on 70 instead of 64 as I would like it to be. I hope this helps. Nest is a decent thermostat. They just need to do some tweaking to the little machine. Maybe Nest 2 is in order..

  4. ThermostatVeteran Friday, January 27, 2012

    The reality of the Nest is that the idea that an algorithm can control your thermostat better than you can is totally bogus. People set their thermostat at the edge of their comfort level already and if you go beyond that threshold they will not be happy.

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