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The reverb from Kevin Delaney’s departure from the Wall Street Journal for Atlantic Media Group just hit DC: WSJ alum Raju Narisetti is head…

Raju Narisetti, Managing Editor, Washington Post

The reverb from Kevin Delaney’s departure from the Wall Street Journal for Atlantic Media Group just hit DC: WSJ alum Raju Narisetti is headed back to the Journal, swapping his role as managing editor of the Washington Post responsible for digital for managing editor of The Wall Street Journal (NSDQ: NWS) Digital Network. Narisetti, the founder editor of India’s Mint newspaper, also will be a deputy managing editor of the Journal. Release below.

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NEW YORK, Jan. 20, 2012 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The Wall Street Journal has named Raju Narisetti as Managing Editor of The Wall Street Journal Digital Network, which includes WSJ.com, SmartMoney.com, MarketWatch and the Chinese, Japanese and German-language editions of WSJ.com. Mr. Narisetti will also become a Deputy Managing Editor of the Journal, and he will report to Alan Murray, Deputy Managing Editor and Executive Editor, Online.

Mr. Narisetti currently serves as Managing Editor for The Washington Post (NYSE: WPO), where he oversees the company’s digital content products, staff and strategy. Today’s appointment marks a return to the Journal for Mr. Narisetti, who first joined the paper in 1994 as a reporter in Pittsburgh and most recently served as Editor of The Wall Street Journal Europe in 2006.

“Raju has done remarkable work as the digital czar at the Washington Post, integrating print and online businesses, building a successful web site, and developing key relationships with the digerati,” said Robert Thomson, Editor-in-Chief of Dow Jones and Managing Editor of the Journal. “His experience in creating Mint, a national web site and newspaper in India, also brings important relationships and unique expertise that will assist us as we expand our global digital network. Raju is wired, and we are jazzed.”

“Raju knows the world, knows digital journalism, and knows the Journal,” said Mr. Murray. “He is the perfect person to lead us into a new era of global growth.”

Mr. Narisetti’s appointment follows the recent departure of WSJ.com Managing Editor Kevin Delaney.

Strong Digital Growth from New Content, Product Offerings and Global Expansion

The Wall Street Journal Digital Network has seen tremendous growth in recent years with the introduction of expanded news coverage, content and new products as well as increased usage across its Web sites, mobile applications and tablet editions. The network has more than 1.3 million paid digital subscribers across multiple platforms and devices, and averages more than 50 million visitors per month online.

WSJ.com’s success has been buoyed by an expansion in politics, national and world news, sports and lifestyle coverage, as well as live and on-demand video, real-time blogs and the launch of premium verticals. WSJ.com generated a 42% year-over-year increase in traffic in 2011, averaging more than 36 million visitors per month worldwide. The new WSJ Live interactive video application is already available to millions of users via the iPad and multiple Internet-connected televisions and set-top boxes.

Globally, more than 30% of the total digital audience comes from outside the North American market, including Asia, which generates more than 11 million visitors per month, and nearly six million from Europe, Middle East and Africa. In 2011, traffic to the Journal’s Chinese- and Japanese-language Web sites increased 38% and 150%, respectively.

To further serve its expanding global audience, the Journal and Dow Jones have launched a series of regionally focused digital initiatives – the most recent of which, a German-language news site (WSJ.de), launched earlier this month. Other regional offerings are available, including China, Japan, Korea, India, Southeast Asia, and Central and Eastern Europe.

  1. Isn’t this a demotion, in that he’s now the #2 digital editorial guy at WSJ? Admittedly, The Journal is a much bigger business revenuewise than WaPo, but still, something must have happened in DC to compel him to move. Conversely, find it odd for Delaney to decamp to The Atlantic, which despite it’s positive PR is about 10% the size of The WSJ Digital Network.

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