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Summary:

Want the short course on why SOPA is getting such blowback? Clay Shirky breaks it down in this 13-minute talk at the TED offices, explaining…

Clay Shirky
photo: Pop!Tech

Want the short course on why SOPA is getting such blowback? Clay Shirky breaks it down in this 13-minute talk at the TED offices, explaining how the proposed government initiatives are supposed to work — and why they wouldn’t succeed.

  1. great piece by clay, but a bit disingenuous.  yes, the key is flipping the burden of proof and the entertainment industry wants to go back to the old days, but to say that every content holder should have to go after every individual infringer is a bit unreasonable when you consider that in most cases, legitimate and reasonable cases, where they go after a super-infringer, the cost of going after them (let alone taking it the distance) far outweighs the per instance benefit.  and if you multiply that by 1000’s, or better yet 000,000’s…then you have made their rights worthless. 

    there needs to be a reasoned and equitable middle ground here. SOPA and PIPA are not it, but letting companies, like his bakery, make money off the property (yes, property – somehow intellectual property, IP, doesn’t seem to get the same scrutiny as something on the shelf, or the items in your home) of others without restriction is also no answer.  this is the perfect illustration of ‘the tragedy of the commons’ and it cannot be just brushed aside by simply saying internet ‘good’, established entertainment companies ‘bad’.  like carbon fuels and car manufacturers, it’s time to factor in all costs and all benefits and apportion as fairly as practicable

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  2. great piece by clay, but a bit disingenuous. yes, the key is flipping the burden of proof and the entertainment industry wants to go back to the old days, but to say that every content holder should have to go after every individual infringer is a bit unreasonable when you consider that in most cases, legitimate and reasonable cases, where they go after a super-infringer, the cost of going after them (let alone taking it the distance) far outweighs the per instance benefit. and if you multiply that by 1000’s, or better yet 000,000’s…then you have made their rights worthless.

    there needs to be a reasoned and equitable middle ground here. SOPA and PIPA are not it, but letting companies, like his bakery, make money off the property (yes, property – somehow intellectual property, IP, doesn’t seem to get the same scrutiny as something on the shelf, or the items in your home) of others without restriction is also no answer. this is the perfect illustration of ‘the tragedy of the commons’ and it cannot be just brushed aside by simply saying internet ‘good’, established entertainment companies ‘bad’. like carbon fuels and car manufacturers, it’s time to factor in all costs and all benefits and apportion as fairly as practicable     

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