Summary:

Analysts at IDC have projected that the dollar per gigabyte price barrier for solid state drives should fall by the second half of this year. What does that mean for data centers, where many operators want to bring down energy usage while speeding up web serving?

greenitlogo

Analysts at IDC projected last week that the dollar per gigabyte price barrier for solid state drives (SSDs) should fall by the second half of this year, points out Adam Lesser, GigaOM Pro Green IT analyst in his weekly column (subscription required). That’s great news for consumers eager to see flash memory bring down the weight and increase the performance of laptops. But what does it mean for cloud computing and data centers, where many want to bring down energy usage while speeding up web serving?

Adam says:

SSDs have no moving parts and don’t get hot, which means they are quieter and don’t require much cooling. They also use less space, which impacts how much data center real estate is needed. The Storage Networking Industries Association (SNIA) estimates that 13 percent of the total power consumption in a data center comes from storage. While not a massive amount, it is enough to impact Google or LinkedIn’s bottom line, and if the performance characteristics of SSDs show a marked difference in consumers’ experiences, going green and creating a place for SSDs in the data center will become an increasing consideration.

To read the rest of his column check out GigaOM Pro.

Adam also published an extensive fourth quarter report for cleantech this week (subscription required), including the latest details on solar, electric cars, the state of subsidies and the smart grid.

Comments have been disabled for this post