iPhone is for games; Android is for other apps

android-apps (1)

IPhone and Android phones are two different platforms, and app search firm Xyologic is bringing that point home again with an analysis of the top apps on both platforms. Xyologic found that of the top 150 apps downloaded on each platform in 2011, 85 of the 150 on Android leaned toward non-gaming apps, while 100 of the top 150 apps on the iPhone were games.

Non-gaming apps on Android generated 91.5 million downloads in November compared to 33.4 million for games. Meanwhile on the iPhone, games in November generated 71.6 million downloads while other apps received 25.6 million downloads.

Android was actually even more tilted in favor of apps in 2010, with 116 of the top 150 apps being non-games. The iPhone used to be more balanced with 79 of the top apps being games compared to 71 percent for non-gaming apps.

Now, all but one of the top downloaded publishers on iPhone are gamemakers except for Instagram maker Burbn. On Android, the top 25 developers on Android were a mix of gaming and non-gaming publishers with Google at the head of the class. Google only had two apps on Android Market in 2010, Google Maps and Google Sky, but now the company has many more available on Android.

Here’s the list of the top 25 downloaded publishers on Android in 2011 according to Xyologic:
GoogleFacebookRovioAdobeDroidHen CasualOutfit7Magma MobileGlu MobileGo Dev TeamKittehface SoftwareSkypeNotesNikolay AnanievSwiss CodemonkeysNHN CorporationYahooHandcentPandoraAl Factory LimitedKaufcom Games Apps WidgetsVerizon WirelessRunnergamesBackflip StudiosPolarbit.

And here’s the list of the top 25 downloaded publishers on the iPhone in 2011:

Glu Mobile, GameloftBig Fish Games, Rovio, Capcom, Chilingo  Storm8/(TeamLava), Outfit7, Electronic Arts/Electronic Arts BV, Gamevil, Halfbrick Studios, DeNa/(Backflip Studios/Ngmoco), Zynga/Newtoy, NaturalMotion, Pocket Gem/(Streetview Labs), Tencent, NimbleBit, PopCap, Playforge, Clickgamer, Com2uS, Burbn, Orangenose Studios.

This might not be news to some developers, who are aware of the relative strengths of each platform. But it’s interesting to again see how each platform differs, where the trends are going and where the opportunities lie. The iPhone is really becoming a powerful gaming device, but Android is more of a broad provider of utilities and services.

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