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What’s the real reason behind the delay of the BlackBerry 10 handsets, which has Research in Motion (NSDQ: RIMM) in a lot of trouble heading…

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photo: Flickr/Perrimoon

What’s the real reason behind the delay of the BlackBerry 10 handsets, which has Research in Motion (NSDQ: RIMM) in a lot of trouble heading into 2012? One report thinks it has less to do with hardware and more to do with the continuing problems integrating RIM’s best old-school feature into its new-school operating system.

BGR, which tends to have friends inside RIM but has otherwise uncorked some whoppers this year, reported Thursday that one insider scoffed at co-CEO Mike Lazaridis’ assertion that a last-minute decision to change the chips needed for the one is to blame for the delay. Instead, according to the unnamed source, it’s all about RIM’s inability to make its e-mail software work with the BlackBerry 10 operating system: one of the reasons that its Playbook tablet was dead on arrival is because the company still hasn’t delivered a software update with that capability.

It’s certainly plausible that RIM is still having trouble making the e-mail software that remains its best asset work with the new operating system. There’s no way RIM would be able to get away with shipping a BlackBerry smartphone that didn’t have a native e-mail experience.

But it really doesn’t matter. Whether or not the problems lie in hardware or software, RIM’s inability to execute is the main reason why its stock has plunged, why competitors are kicking the tires, and why its CEOs simply have to go.

Updated: RIM chose to speak out on this rumor, rather than just letting it sit, and reiterated that the hardware decision has caused the delay. “As explained on our earnings call, the broad engineering impact of this decision and certain other factors significantly influenced the anticipated timing for the BlackBerry 10 devices. The anonymous claim suggesting otherwise is inaccurate and uninformed,” it said in a statement to AllThingsD.

  1. It his hard to fathom how a company so large and who used to hold such a market dominant position could allow this to happen.  I imagine few people will argue with the strengths of the Blackberry (email), but using it for any other purpose can just be painful when compared to an iOS or Android device.

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    1. I happen to be of a different opinion. The browser renders faster and cleaner than the fastest Android I had the chance to play with, which (I’m told) is better than the iphone’s.
      I use 4-5 apps on a daily basis and maybe 10 in total, and I don’t need more just because the respective websites don’t render properly.
      Oh, and I looove the keyboard…

      Regardless, there seems to be more to the BB10 delay than the lame LTE chip excuse (but NOT some “incompatibility” between QNX and email :-), one thinks they would have figured this long ago…)

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  2. QNX microkernel offers kernel level services to the OS which must add in the missing 90% of code to make the OS complete, and this is on a per-device basis, meaning if you build two devices, say, a 7-inch Playbook and a 10-inch LTE Playbook, then you would have two Rim OS’s both based on QNX but each having to add in the 90% additional code in order to make these different Playbooks complete, notwithstanding the all-important and mandatory design and bug shakedowns, and all of these must be in place and ready before any interested developer would begin writing one single line of code for apps that would run on these Rim things. Rim said it could make QNX run Android? That would be impossible because even Samsung, LG, Motorola native Android machines are not compatible with each other, QNX’s supposedly Android player would not work at all being an extra layer away from hosting Android, which Android would that be? and which Android apps? This won’t fly.

    It took Apple 33 years to get it right, Apple wasn’t a company that started in 2006. The foundation of iOS comes from the world’s most robust, trusted, tested, endorsed, written for, copied after and celebrated technology company in the world, Apple. 

    Frankly, how can Rim compete? A machine is far far more than a mobile browser. As if you have absolutely no idea about it. Ever used an iPhone?

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