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Some stats out today from Nielsen for Q3 show that Android is continuing on its growth trajectory in the U.S. but in the last quarter Apple’…

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Some stats out today from Nielsen for Q3 show that Android is continuing on its growth trajectory in the U.S. but in the last quarter Apple’s share remained the same as it was in Q2.

According to Nielsen’s numbers, the percentage of phones now in the market that are smartphones stands at 43 percent — compared to 40 percent in Q2. Coincidentally, those are the same percentages for Android within the smartphone market. Android, the most-common platform, now has a 43 percent penetration in the U.S. market, compared to 40 percent the quarter before.

As we have seen in other reports on Q3, Apple (NSDQ: AAPL) did not see any growth. According to Nielsen, its marketshare in the remained steady at 28 percent. That still makes Apple the biggest manufacturer of them all, since Android devices are made by a number of OEMs.

(Figures from other analyst houses such as Strategy Analytics and Kantar Worldpanel have noted that HTC has shipped the most Android devices in the last quarter. Nielsen does not break out which Android device maker has the highest penetration to date.)

As with Apple, Windows Phone saw no change in its marketshare, which stood at seven percent, while RIM (NSDQ: RIMM) declined slightly to 18 percent compared to 19 percent the quarter before.

Breaking out some figures on how smartphones are selling among different age groups, the 25-34 age group is providing to be the most smartphone-friendly at the moment, with a penetration of 62 percent for smartphone ownership.

Those aged between 18 and 24 are second in the rankings, with smartphone penetration of 54 percent.

One opportunity for carriers and OEMs could be in targeting so-called “silver surfers.” Only 18 percent of consumers aged over 64 years old are using smartphones, significantly below the average penetration of 43 percent. Given how many innovations there are on devices today to make use easier — from voice-commands to swyping gestures to type — it’s a surprise that we haven’t seen more marketing targeting this group already.

  1. Well, a lot of us are retired and are able to do most of our communication from home on land lines or wi-fi.  The need for a third device (after the laptop and the Pad) that requires a monthly contract is pretty slim.  Currently I have a really old  Moto on a pay as you go system.  It generally sits uncharged and with no minutes unless I have a specific reason for using it.  I like the idea of SIRI, since I could then use it as a notepad while I am out; but that would not be enough to open another sink hole for my limited pension funds.

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