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Summary:

The iPod of thermostats is sold-out until 2012. Nest Labs, makers of the connected, smart, “learning” thermostat, say on their website that the hot thermostat is “sold out through early next year.” In the meantime, the company has closed its online store.

The Nest thermostat (in cooling mode).

The Nest thermostat (in cooling mode).

The iPod of thermostats is sold-out until 2012. Nest Labs, makers of the connected, smart, “learning” thermostat, say on their website that the hot thermostat is “sold out through early next year.” In the meantime, the company has closed its online store at Nest.com.

I just pre-ordered one via the Best Buy website, and mine won’t ship until between Jan. 9 and Jan. 16, 2012. (Sorry, Mom and Dad, your Christmas present will be late.)

Nest says on its site that people who reserved a thermostat via the Nest store, and received a reservation number, can get theirs between Dec. 2011 and Feb. 2012. For people who pre-ordered one on Best Buy and Nest.com, the shipping date on your confirmation email still stands.

I’ve reached out to the company to see what kind of volumes have led to the company selling out til 2012. It’s a $250 thermostat, so regardless, that’s pretty impressive.

The thermostat was created by Tony Fadell, the former chief architect at Apple, who led the development of the iPod and the first three versions of the iPhone, and who left Apple two years ago to start connected thermostat company Nest Labs. The thermostat has a unique design and learning, behavioral algorithms, which can help home owners save 20 to 30 percent on their energy bills. Fadell told me in an interview last month that he wanted to make the device “a coveted, cherished object that sits on your wall.”

Nest has been operating for about a year and a half, has 100 employees, and raised funding from Kleiner Perkins, Google Ventures and Al Gore’s investment fund. The company only came out of stealth on Oct. 24 (about a week ago) to reveal its smart thermostat design and energy efficiency ambitions.

  1. So I guess my multi-stage unit that’s “coming soon” is not really coming all that soon then. :(

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    1. Well at least you know that you have to look for another one now.

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  2. Sorry, I want my thermostat to be invisible.It needs to just work and be as unobtrusive as possible. My current unit also has learning capability, and cost significantly less.

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  3. “Nest has been operating for about a year and a half, has 100 employees, and raised funding from Kleiner Perkins, Google Ventures and Al Gore’s investment fund.”

    You can count me out! Al Gore is a damn fool and a swindling thief.

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  4. >I’ve reached out to the company to see what kind of volumes have led to the company selling out til 2012.

    Any update on this? This is really not news if we are talking 100 units.

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  5. open4energy.com publishes a directory of energy saving devices – with heating and cooling being 50% of a larger homes electricity bill, no wonder it is a hot topic.

    I understand why looks and usability are cool – but I would prefer to understand more about its algorithm and how it can work with on an line weather services like EcoFactors’s product.

    After all, boring as I may seem, I think the idea is to save energy, and the proof of this product will be in the amount of energy it saves!

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  6. The baddest product on the market for the Holidays!!! Nest’s smart thermostat http://t.co/b7jxGbgW

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  7. Nest’s smart thermostat sold out until 2012 http://t.co/NEWfjc5h

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  8. Nest’s smart thermostat sold out until 2012 — Cleantech News and Analysis http://t.co/i5MzlMuO

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  9. Nest’s thermostat makes me want to buy a house, just so I can install it. http://t.co/mYgaLnfy

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  10. Nest’s smart thermostat sold out until 2012 http://t.co/emV2lXwO

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