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Summary:

BitTorrent Inc. is starting to stream a live DJ set out of its office every Friday afternoon to stress-test its new live streaming platform. BitTorrent inventor Bram Cohen and his team have been developing the live streaming platform for close to three years.

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BitTorrent Inc. is broadcasting a live DJ set out of its downtown San Francisco office every Friday afternoon to stress-test its upcoming P2P live streaming platform.

The company did a first test featuring local DJ Janaka Selekta last week and is now officially promoting the event series on Facebook and Twitter. From the newly launched BitTorrent Live Studio Facebook page:

“BitTorrent Live is rolling out exciting live events every Friday in order to kick the tires on our new peer-to-peer live streaming technology. Help us define the future of live streaming by testing our software and promoting the live studio sessions.”

BitTorrent inventor Bram Cohen and his team have been working for close to three years on a new P2P platform that makes it possible to stream live content with minimal latency. We were first to report earlier this month that the company is now moving to the next stage in the development of its live streaming platform, which involves larger stress tests of live content.

The next of these tests will star Six Degrees Recording Artist Jef Stott on October 21 at 5 p.m. PDT

Check out an interview with Bram Cohen about his live streaming platform below:

Image of the studio setup in BitTorrent’s offices courtesy of BitTorrent Inc.

  1. Randall Bennett Friday, October 21, 2011

    Does it require a browser plugin? What’s the peg? Any way to implement a standardized (or JS) thing that won’t require plugin-a-palooza?

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    1. It’s a plugin. I would imagine that the company might eventually bundle it with its uTorrent client, which already has a big footprint, but I’m not sure it could be easily done in the browser…

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  2. Minneapolitan Friday, October 21, 2011

    He’s been working on this for 3 YEARS, and in the meantime, the cost of bandwidth has plummeted (and continues to get cheaper) and adaptive bitrate technologies ensure a pretty good user experience across the board. Let’s hear more about the business case. They couldn’t make it work the first time. What makes this different?

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