Summary:

Samsung and Apple (NSDQ: AAPL) continue to clean up in the U.S. smartphone market while it now seems clear that the launch of the Verizon iP…

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Samsung and Apple (NSDQ: AAPL) continue to clean up in the U.S. smartphone market while it now seems clear that the launch of the Verizon iPhone–a positive development for Apple and Verizon, of course–has not slowed the Android tide, as smartphones running Android now account for over 40 percent of those in use in the U.S.

Comscore’s latest numbers reinforce the same trends we’ve seen all year in the U.S. smartphone market. RIM (NSDQ: RIMM) and Motorola (NYSE: MMI) are struggling, the former because each month fewer people in the U.S. are using a BlackBerry and the latter because of product delays and strong competition. RIM lost 5 percentage points of smartphone operating system market share in August as compared to May, dropping it to just 19 percent of the market.

Meanwhile, Android gained a nearly identical amount, 5.6 percentage points, to hold 44 percent of the market as measured by operating system in August. That doesn’t even take into account the launches of Samsung’s Galaxy S II and Motorola’s Droid Bionic, both of which arrived in September and have been very well-received by the gadget reviewers.

Apple is of course still chugging along, picking up 0.7 percentage points of platform market share in August during a month in which speculation about a next-generation product began to mount. The iPhone 4S will go on sale for AT&T (NYSE: T), Verizon, and Sprint’s network next week. But Samsung is still the leading smartphone vendor in the U.S. with 25 percent of all mobile subscribers sorted by device maker as of August.

A few broad conclusions: Android is hurting RIM more than it is hurting Apple. Apple is in excellent shape heading into the holiday season but will want to keep an eye on Samsung and Google’s CTIA event next week. And Microsoft (NSDQ: MSFT) better hope that the first few Nokia (NYSE: NOK) Windows Phone 7 devices spark some demand, because its share of the U.S. mobile market is at 5.7 percent and it is not going in the right direction.

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