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Summary:

New data out of eMarketer shows that mobile advertising is finally starting to attract the respect — and the money — it deserves. Advertisers will likely spend $1.23 billion on U.S. mobile ads this year, the first time the industry’s annual revenues have surpassed $1 billion.

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All the hype about the upcoming iPhone update is just the latest indication that we are indeed entering the post-PC era. And though big budget advertisers are typically slow to change their spending habits, it seems that many of them have finally gotten the memo that one of the best places to reach today’s consumer is on his or her mobile device.

Advertisers are on track to spend $1.23 billion on mobile advertising this year in the United States, a 65-percent boost up from the $743 million they spent last year, eMarketer said in a forecast released Tuesday. This will be the first time the industry’s annual revenues have surpassed the $1 billion mark.

And the growth is not going to slow down any time soon: By 2015, the U.S. mobile advertising market will likely reach $4.4 billion annually. The projections cover ads shown on both mobile phones and tablets, eMarketer said. While messaging-based ads are the most popular format currently, search and banner ads will overtake them by next year with search ads expected to lead the way by 2015. Video ads, which make up just 4.7 percent expected spending, are projected to almost double by 2015.

Even though people are happily spending more time than ever consuming content on their mobile devices, advertisers have historically spent much less of their budgets on mobile media than on other formats. However, it’s now looking like mobile advertising is finally starting to attract the respect — and the money — it deserves.

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  1. Giancarlo Maniaci Tuesday, October 4, 2011

    Mobile is growing, and fast. It seems that the adoption rates have increased tremendously as proof of concepts reservations have turned spectators into buyers. – Giancarlo Maniaci, TapIt.com

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