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Summary:

Have your kids taken over your Netflix queue? Does your recently watched list look like the broadcast schedule of Nickelodeon? Then check out this episode of Cord Cutters for a closer look at a service that promises to sort your family’s Netflix favorites into separate queues.

cord cutters multiqs

Want to separate the movies your kids are watching from your Netflix queue? Then check out this Cord Cutters episode about Multiqs.com:

Show notes for this episode:

Let us know how you are incorporating Netflix into your family’s TV watching habits. Has the service been taken over by your kids, or do you have other tricks to keep track of your favorite Netflix content? Fire away in the comments, get in touch with us on Twitter (@cordcutters) or Facebook or email us at cordcutters @ gigaom.com.

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  1. Janko, Scott Chaney from MultiQs here. Thanks for the review and the kind words. I would like to point out a couple of things that may help our Roku Channel work better for those with small kids. Prior to Roku 2, you could disable browsing in Netflix using the Settings channel. In that way even tho we’re forced to take you to Netflix to play the title, your children couldn’t browse Netflix once there. Unfortunately that setting isn’t there in the Roku 2 but Netflix would put it back in if they hear from enough folks. Also, if you don’t want your kids to browse at all, but only watch videos you select, then you can “Lock” their account so all they get to do is select from titles you put in their queue.

    And lastly, an appeal. The capability exists in Roku for us to direct Netflix to directly launch a video and then return control to MultiQs when done, but so far Netflix has not elected to implement this functionality. They do listen to their customers tho.

    Thanks again.

  2. In general, it looks like a good solution that Netflix should be doing themselves. However, I like the idea of someone independent *IF* they do more than Netflix. MultiQs would be a lot more beneficial (and I’d pay more) if it included Amazon, Amazon Prime, Crackle, Vudu, and maybe even Blockbuster. I’d even like to see something that included the local inventory of RedBox. On the downside, the MultiQs web site is horrible from a first-time user point. I followed the link to it and the ONLY thing you can do is sign up for a “free” trial. Well, I don’t want to do that right now. I want to browse through the web site and learn more about MultiQs. Things like who are the people behind it … what does it support … etc. I don’t want to give away my name and email addresses (much less a credit card #) without a warm and fuzzy that it is a legitimate site.

    1. George, All good points, many of which we are pursuing. The reason we ask for a login before entering the site (we definitely don’t ask for a credit card) is we have to be able to uniquely identify the different queues you create.

      1. I agree that a demo mode would be great – or maybe even just a few words of explanation, or a video…

      2. Scott, 99.999% of every legitimate web site has some information about themselves … management, press releases, news, About Us, What we do, Feedback, etc… but -nothing- for you. I might try it in the future, given that a review by GigaOm sort of gives it a good referral. But if I had stumbled upon it by a less-trusted referral source than GigaOm, then no way. PS: Besides all of the other content sources, add local streaming.

  3. Post cable, our kids watch Netflix almost exclusively. In our house, the primary TV is routed mainly through a TiVo HD. On the TiVo’s meager Netflix client, you can only access the Netflix instant play queue.

    Our hack then is to only put kids shows in the Netflix queue.

    TiVo’s “just capable enough” Netflix client then functions as a defacto parental control system for Netflix.

    My wife and I access Netflix / Amazon Instant Video via the more full-featured clients in a Panasonic bluray player. Which we have yet to use for actual bluray disks. ;)

  4. I’ve asked Netflix about implementing personal queues more than once. They tell me that that in not possible to implement, which I know is baloney. I don’t want my young children to have access to the mature movies in my queue, so I dropped them – problem solved.

    There was another reason I dropped them though. I didn’t want to pay for the Latin America infrastructure with their huge price increase. There are too many other options and there will be more coming. I haven’t had Netflix for three months now and don’t even miss them.

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