Summary:

Even Emily Post would be out of her depth in the world of modern technology, so WorkSnug is asking remote workers on the ground to weigh in with their rules for coffee shop worker etiquette – and offering a prize to the most popular suggestions.

coffee shop code of conduct

Half a dozen cutlery options or sticky social situations might not have fazed Emily Post, but it’s likely the old guard of etiquette expertise would be flummoxed by the world of modern technology. With cell phones available everywhere (even the subway as of this week), dozens of means of communication to contend with and our  general tendency towards familiarity, avoiding rudeness while not seeming like you’re simply avoiding people seems harder than ever before.

And what about the special plight of the coffee shop-dwelling, laptop-toting, mobile worker? Free range workers who conduct their business out in public face a whole host of new issues, from how many coffees to order to keep the wait staff happy, to how quiet to keep your calls in aid of your fellow workers’ concentration. The rules are under construction, and there’s no consensus on what constitutes good manners.

Sticky conundrums and confusion abound, so WorkSnug, a tool to help mobile workers find work spaces nearby, is crowdsourcing tips and suggestions to keep everyone content and companionable working together in coffee shops.

To participate in their “Coffee Shop Worker Code of Conduct,” just go to their website by the end of October and suggest your own rules of good behavior for remote workers, or vote on which ideas others have submitted you like best. To get you thinking, the current top 10 includes not yelling like you’re on a construction site, not hogging electrical sockets (you know who you are, and you should be ashamed) and helping to promote the coffee shops you frequent.

“The whole company is based on a pet peeve, frankly,” explained coffee shop veteran and WorkSnug founder Richard Leyland. “There wasn’t a central reviews-base of places that are the best to go. It’s not much of an extension to think, well, what are the rules of etiquette?”

So express yourself over on WorkSnug, and we’ll be posting the final results here on WebWorkerDaily once they’re out in early November. If your idea makes it into the top 10, you win a Plantronics Discovery 975 headset and an ultra-compact Nokia E6 QWERTY and touch-screen smartphone. And maybe your fellow coffee shop denizens will even cut out some of their most annoying behavior.

What’s your coffee shop etiquette pet peeve?

Image courtesy of Flickr use CarbonNYC.

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