Summary:

The latest mobile video sharing app, called Klip, aims to separate itself from the crowd with high-speed adaptive bit-rate technology enabling users to scroll through videos and a new tagging system that lets them set categories to keep track of when new videos are uploaded.

klip

It seems every month or so another mobile video sharing service pops up, promising to make it easier for users to share experiences they’ve shot on their phones with friends. The latest, called Klip, aims to separate itself from the rest of the crowd with high-speed adaptive bit-rate technology that will allow users to scroll through videos and a new tagging system that lets them set categories to keep track of when new videos are uploaded.

With an ever-growing number of consumers walking around with video cameras on their mobile phones, Klip hopes to become the go-to app for shooting, uploading and sharing videos with friends. With a simple interface for connecting to networks like Facebook, Twitter and YouTube, Klip makes it easy to reach friends and family where they already are.

Of course, Klip is far from alone in the social/mobile video sharing game. There are any number of startups seeking to own the nascent market and become the Instagram of video. Among others, there’s Socialcam (recently spun out from Justin.tv), BlipSnips, Tout, Vibop, Viddy, Vlix and Vloggo.

Klip’s big differentiator is an ultrafast adaptive-streaming technology that enables users to quickly scroll through elements of a video without having to play the whole thing. It also has a dynamic hashtag system, which lets users create and track different categories attached to videos that are uploaded. And, like most competitors, it also lets users tag their friends in videos, make comments and favorite videos that were uploaded by friends and contacts.

For an idea of how it works, check out this promotional video from Klip:

One other advantage Klip has is its founder: The company was created in April 2011 by serial entrepreneur Alain Rossman, the former chairman of Vudu (before the company was sold to Wal-Mart) and OpenWave, among others. Altogether, Rossman has founded five startups, three of which went public and two of which were acquired. This latest venture has raised $2 million in funding from Rossman and Matrix Partners.

That said, it’s a very crowded market. Klip has very cool technology, but it will also need consumer adoption to make it worthwhile for most users. With a number of competitors already vying for consumers’ attention when it comes to sharing their videos on social networks, Klip has a tough road ahead.

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