Summary:

It’s time for Today in Green IT! Another bit of interesting info from Google’s new green site is how aggressively Google argues that PUE (Power Usage Effectiveness) needs to be measured as often as possible, points Adam Lesser, our GigaOM Pro Green IT analyst.

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While Google finally unveiled its electricity footprint, perhaps the most interesting info coming out of Google’s new green site is how aggressively Google argues that PUE (Power Usage Effectiveness) needs to be measured as often as possible and over a year, points out Adam Lesser, our GigaOM Pro Green IT analyst in his daily update.

Adam notes: One of the core problems with data center energy efficiency metrics is that companies can take PUE measurements during cold months when cooling costs can be relatively low. But measuring it monthly or even daily over the course of a year will give the most honest data on how efficiently a data center is functioning.

Other stories on Adam’s radar today include:

  • Ford has named William Helman IV, the lead director for Zipcar and a partner at investment firm Greylock Partners, to its board. The relationship between Zipcar and Ford deepens. It will be interesting to see how the automotive industry handles the growth of car sharing, which could threaten new car sales. On the other hand, it could bring cars to those who don’t typically have access to them (like college students).
  • GE has secured $3 million from the DOE for a project that will apply MRI magnet tech to wind turbines. The goal is to build a much larger turbine capable of 10–15 MW of output compared with the traditional 2–4 MW.
  • Solar company failure shows less federal aid works Better: view: The editors at Bloomberg may have a point that the government is better off making small cleantech investments rather than utility level ones like the one it made it Solyndra. But they’re smoking something when they write that, “Silicon Valley is thick with venture capitalists willing to finance risky, iconoclastic startups,” suggesting that Solyndra and others can solely rely on VC. Building a utility scale renewable energy company requires major debt capital and no VC is interested in financing that.

To read all of our content about green IT and cleantech — including reports, statistics, studies and analysis — check out GigaOM Pro (subscription required), including our latest Flash Analysis on the lessons learned from Solyndra’s bankruptcy.

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