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Android may be the biggest mobile operating system, but do iPhone owners enjoy video more often? Statistics collected by video encoding comp…

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Android may be the biggest mobile operating system, but do iPhone owners enjoy video more often? Statistics collected by video encoding company Vid.ly would seem to indicate they do.

A service for both encoding video into various formats and shortening URLs, Vid.ly launched in January, and founder Jeff Malkin says company has served up over 5 million videos in that time. Of those videos, 62.5% were watched on iPhones, almost 24% were watched on Android phones, just over 11% were watched on Blackberries, and 2.38% were consumed on iPads.

That seems to indicate that Apple (NSDQ: AAPL) devices are being used disproportionately for watching video; recent numbers show that last quarter, around 18 percent of smartphones sold worldwide were running Apple’s iOS, whereas 43 percent used Android. In the U.S., Apple has close to 27 percent of the total smartphone market.

Vid.ly converts publishers’ source video into a variety of different formats and bitrates, allowing the video to be played on all major desktop browsers and mobile devices through a short URL that starts with vid.ly. Today, Malkin is launching a “pro” version of the Vid.ly service that allows for greater customization and access to Vid.ly’s API. Malkin says he has around 100 customers already using the Vid.ly Pro service, and that many of them are mobile app developers who needed a simple video solution to push their ideas forward. “There’s been an explosion of photo apps across iPhone and Android, but not yet an explosion of video apps,” says Malkin. He’s hoping that will change soon, as the first wave of his Vid.ly Pro customers prepare to launch their services to the public.

Overall, several months after Google (NSDQ: GOOG) started a kind of video “format war” by dropping support for the dominant online video format, the world of online video is as fractured as ever. “I think it’s getting increasingly chaotic for content publishers,” says Malkin, who also founded Encoding.com. “There are no signs of convergence whatsoever. Even in Android alone, there’s not one version [of video] that works for all Android phones.”

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