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Summary:

This further reinforces our belief that opportunities for the growth of Nokia’s smartphone business will be greatest with Windows Phone. This could prove to be a massive catalyst for the Windows Phone ecosystem. Additionally, with our respective intellectual property portfolios, Nokia and Microsoft are working together […]

This further reinforces our belief that opportunities for the growth of Nokia’s smartphone business will be greatest with Windows Phone. This could prove to be a massive catalyst for the Windows Phone ecosystem. Additionally, with our respective intellectual property portfolios, Nokia and Microsoft are working together to build and nurture an innovative ecosystem that benefits consumers, operators, developers and other device manufacturers.

Nokia provided us a with an official statement in regard to Google’s $12.5 billion bid to purchase Motorola Mobility, suggesting the deal could be good for Microsoft’s mobile platform. I agree and alluded to that potential earlier today saying, “Now that Google will in some sense be competing with its hardware partners, some of them could choose to invest more resources in Microsoft’s platform as a result. In that scenario, Microsoft wins by gathering more handset support without needing to buy a hardware maker.”

Google has said it will run Motorola as a separate business, but that may not prevent current Android handset makers from fully trusting Google going forward. Instead of fully embracing Android then, where else can these companies turn but to Microsoft’s Windows Phone 7, which is the last major mobile platform available for licensing? Call me crazy, but for the first time since the Apple iPhone was introduced, I actually think Nokia is in a good position!

  1. But KFC says it will help them at Popeye’s expense. Come on – you printed Nokia’s press release, why not KFC’s?

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  2. That is a truly idiotic thing for Nokia to say. I can only assume they are trying to put a brave face on the situation.

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  3. Sooooo, other companies will make Windows Phones that won’t sell because….why?

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  4. Yeah, um, this is quite a stretch., and that’s putting it nicely.

    Why would manufacturers embrace a platform that costs them more, hasn’t gained a lick of traction even WITH Microsoft dumping a cool billion into marketing, and ALSO has a potentially “preferred” hardware partner in Nokia?

    The worst case scenario for Android makers, if you can call it that, is if Google releases top quality phones under Motorola Mobile, but that would be a blessing for everyone involved. Consumer perception of Android goes up, hardware partners are encouraged to step up their game and everyone in the ecosystem wins except for third rate hardware makers.

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    1. um i thnk you find with google being software thiefs and the fact it needs masses of development from the manufacturers actually makes android loads more expensive. Plus google leaves its partners to the sharks in the legal battles where as with MS they get full legal backup.

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  5. True this very second, but Google won’t/cant’ keep as subsidiary. It’ll get spun off to Icahn or sold to Huawei (someone looking for shiny brand).

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  6. Well MS married Nokia… so why turn to MS as second-in-line customer there?

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  7. I think Nokia meant this means their decision to go with MS was good, as they won’t be competing with Google’s subsidiary. I can understand that sentiment, but I think they’re wrong anyway. Google will use this deal to indemnify the Android mfrs, and then spin off Motorola in a couple years. If there are any patents of value that Mot has, Nokia will have to license them (or get them indirectly from MS, in exchange for MS granting a license for their patents to Android licensees).

    It would be a lot simpler and more efficient if Congress just abolished software patents.

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  8. “Instead of fully embracing Android then, where else can these company’s turn but to Microsoft’s Windows Mobile, which is the last major mobile platform available for licensing?”

    HTC, Samsung and LG have never fully embraced Android. They have always prudently hedged their bets.

    Android is still available for licensing, you just don’t have to pay for it.

    The MS-Nokia deal will actually cost WP7 manufacturers who will now have to pay for OVI Maps and other Nokia services which MS decides to integrate in the WP7 platform.

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  9. Meego is what they should look towards.

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  10. Johnny Tremaine Monday, August 15, 2011

    Of course Nokia will say that, what else can they say?

    It’s not like WP7 device are flying off the shelves; why would, say, LG, Samsung et all, run to embrace Microsoft’s OS, considering they likewise have a sweetheart exclusive deal with Nokia, their pet manufacturer?

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