1. I believe Nintendo would survive better on its own. If it moves over to the iCrowd, it will also isolate a lot of fans too. I would not buy an iPod or iPhone just to keep playing my nintendo games. I would probably just keep playing their old systems and ignore what they do henceforth. I’m buying a 3DS once the price drop as I know many are. Also, they will have more games come out soon enough, especially for the Christmas season which will draw more people. And the only reason I am not buying a Wii is to wait for the Wii U. I think Nintendo will be just fine.

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  2. I can’t help but agree with you. I love Nintendo hardware, always have, always will. But unless they pull something out the bag (not the Wii U), then i’m afraid their hardware days are done for the forseeable future. Mobile platforms would be a natural leap for many of their games seen as they are typically platformers or RPG’s which are not overly strenuous in terms of hardware performance.

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  3. The arguments made here aren’t very convincing. People are concerned that Nintendo’s sales are slumping, but the Wii is still the best-selling of this current console generation. Just because they sold their consoles earlier in the cycle doesn’t mean that they’re doomed to failure as Sega was and that they should just give up and turn into iOS lackies now.
    I am mostly upset because Google News cited this news article and the Bloomberg article being cited here on their “video games” news page, and it made it appear as if everyone thought Nintendo was going down. When really, it was just one article.

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  4. Well-written article, Darrell.

    I’d comment further but I haven’t been following Nintendo much … as shown by the layer of dust on my Wii.

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  5. Apple fan boys writing about a market they know nothing about…

    Nintendo is fine. There is ZERO DEMONSTRABLE PROOF that iOS gaming is affecting any of the other 3 systems.

    Nintendo 3ds is suffering from a lack of game and poorly chosen price point. PERIOD.

    Get over yourself…until there is a decent input mechanism, iOS will only have casual gamers who pay next to nothing for games. Its not a market nor and industry anyone cares about.

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    1. That’s just it, paying for games next to nothing. $60 for a game is too much dough. Kill them by quantity (Example: Angry Birds). iOS has an input mechanism…it’s the phone/tablet. Seems YOU know nothing about it. You have got to be out of your mind to not see the bite Apples app store has taken out of the video game market.

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      1. Michael Vlaming Sunday, August 14, 2011

        He’s talking about physical button input. All any iOS platform has is a touch screen and that simply isn’t sufficient for anything more than casual gaming. Touch screen emulated physical controls simply aren’t as responsive or accurate.

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  6. The arguments that are made here are anecdotal at best. Nintendo is not in any sort of risk of failure as Sega once was, and the example of EA in the iOS market is too early to prove useful. I Nintendo goes onto that hardware its exclusivity and MSRP will go down for good. Speaking of sega, look what happened to Sonic now a days. They should expand business perhaps but this article shows no compelling reasons to change their development and busines strategies.

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  7. There’s no reason they can’t do both. Same thing happened to Digidesign (now Avid), makers of the recording studio standard DAW, Pro Tools. They had a successful hardware-driven business model for two decades. It was chiefly their software that users wanted. But to run their software, you had to use their hardware. As other hardware manufacturers brought enviable products to the table, pressure increased until, last year, they finally released a version of their software that can be run with third-party hardware. They didn’t want to. But it became inevitable. Nevertheless, their hardware line remains strong, because, while it doesn’t meet everyone’s needs, it’s great stuff and a good value. All the console game manufacturers could follow their example and be better off, I think.

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    1. I agree that Nintendo should do both. It can then better understand the unique strengths and weaknesses inherent in each platform and design better games and consoles. Then sell more effectively to the target demographics for each platform.

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  8. NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Nintendo is better on it’s own. It would be terrible as an iOS devoloper!!!!!!!!!

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  9. Id want nintendo to make games for both nintendo devices and iOS devices, they would sell twice as much, although they could just make a nintendo phone running android and thats it

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    1. Bryan Paul Wallis Saturday, August 13, 2011

      I agree.

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  10. This reminds of John Dvorak’s argument that Apple should get out of the hardware business. Also, have you followed Sega post-Dreamcast? The company went from being a console giant to an insignificant publisher.

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