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Summary:

IOS platform competitors take note: Indie iOS dev Chris Eidhof has posted a list of the main reasons why a new developer finds Apple’s mobile OS such an attractive prospect. It’s a nice snapshot of what attracts new dev talent to iOS in the first place.

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IOS platform competitors take note: Fledgling indie iOS dev Chris Eidhof has posted a smart list of the main reasons why a new developer finds Apple’s mobile operating system such an attractive prospect. Eidhof, who is in the process of developing his first software for Apple devices, broke down the appeal of iOS using six main points.

  1. High-end platform. Customers will pay more for apps because the devices they appear on are seen as high-end.
  2. Closed environment. Customers are more willing to trust apps (and spend money on and in them) because Apple has vetted them.
  3. Possibilities for innovation. Apple’s APIs and the benefits of a phone-based platform have only begun to be fully utilized.
  4. Harder than web development. Eidhof’s logic is that because the barrier to entry is higher for iOS development, fewer people will attempt it, so it’s easier to stand out.
  5. Great libraries. Apple’s readymade frameworks are great, with Eidhof citing animation as a perfect example.
  6. Quality in the DNA. Mac and iOS developers tend to strive to live up to the “culture of quality” that surrounds Apple software and devices, and Apple’s defaults help devs start out at a much higher level to begin with.

Eidhof goes into much greater detail about each individual point, so be sure to check out his post in full. I’d also add that iOS is still way ahead of Android (and therefore all other mobile platforms, too) when it comes to actual money made by developers. Android does appear to be slowly gaining favor, and it seems to hold some appeal for developers who want more flexibility with what their apps can access. But for now iOS is still top dog, and competing market channels that can offer devs a raw deal like Amazon’s Appstore  won’t help Android’s situation. Do you think Eidhof is right about why iOS is winning in terms of attracting high-quality developers, or is there something else behind it?

  1. When Oracle, Apple and Microsoft finish legally castrating the baby Android those who worship at the temple of Google will rue the fact they got involved with Android in the first place.

    Injunctions will eventually make Android look and feel like a third world desktop OS of the 1990′s instead of a slick mobile OS.

    Developers and Google will see their dreams shattered with the demise of Android in the public’s eye.

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    1. 1) Oracle won’t win the lawsuit, their claims are too bogus, and most of them have already been thrown out of court. Even if they win, they’ll get like $100 million, not billions. So it won’t even scratch Google.

      2) Apple can’t put injunctions on “Android”. They may be able to put some on some Android devices that look too much alike, and only in some countries. So not a very serious issue, even if this escalates a bit more.

      3) Even if Microsoft makes Android as expensive as WP7, it will only be for the US market, because that’s the only place they can assert their patents, not globally. And even then, Android is still much more appealing because of its popularity versus WP7 (48% market share vs 1%).

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  2. for downloads and much more visit………http://itechbee.blogspot.com/

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  3. developers like iPhone better? more Androids being sold- who uses these apps?

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    1. The millions upon millions of iPhone users? Last I read Android sells more phones, iPhone sells more Apps.

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      1. Actually 2/3 of revenues on iOS come from free apps, not paid ones.

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      2. @Lucian Armasu
        ‘Actually 2/3 of revenue on iOS come from free apps, not paid ones.’
        WTF…how does revenue come from ‘free’ apps?
        As for Oracle not winning their suit against Google – you should do some more reading, the judge’s comment about Google’s internal emails recommending getting a Java license which was ignored, will hurt them a lot.

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  4. Resist Design Thursday, August 4, 2011

    Barrier to entry?

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  5. grantmcwilliams Friday, August 5, 2011

    The interviewed developer is nuts. 1. The iphone is no more high end than any similar Android devices. 2. I don’t think phone users even understand this, they go to the marketplace without thinking. 3. This has nothing to do with iOS and if anything puts it’s competition ahead. 4. Iphone has more apps than anyone else so what’s he smoking? 5. Android can’t animate? Someone better tell Google. 6. Translated as Apple users have 30 years of taking it up the a$$ so they’re used to it.

    The reality is most everything I need on Android is free. On iphone I have to pay for it. This is good for iphone devs for now but don’t you think people will start feeling bad because they have to pay for apps that are free on their friends phones? At the point that Apple has 3% of the marketshare (like their desktops) they’ll be paying for people to make apps. Android isn’t that great and the apps don’t have the same quality but semi-open and free wins E-V-E-R-Y time. Closed, restrictive and expensive loses. Apple didn’t learn this in the 80s and here we are again and they’re doing the same thing. It’s working for now, we’ll revisit this in 5 years.

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    1. > semi-open and free wins E-V-E-R-Y time. Closed, restrictive and expensive loses.

      Yes! You are SO RIGHT! That’s why Red Hat, Debian, and so forth have ABSOLUTELY DEVASTATED the popularity that Microsoft Windows used to have on the desktop before the Open and Free Linux distros turned it into an irrelevancy!

      Oh … wait …

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    2. Ian Blackburn Friday, August 5, 2011

      Most everything I need is free on both iOS and Android. The ratio of free/paid apps is about the same on my Android phone as it is on my iPad. The main difference, as you point out, is that iOS apps tend to be higher quality:

      > the apps don’t have the same quality but semi-open and free wins E-V-E-R-Y time.

      No, *quality* wins every time. Seriously. “Free” hangs in there because it’s free. “Open” is something most people couldn’t care less about (or even define, for that matter).

      The main reason I have an Android is the $25/month prepaid voice/data/text plan. I like & enjoy using it. I’ve been able to find apps that do what I need reasonably well. As an IT guy, it’s good for me to be familiar with both platforms. But every time I pick up my iPad or iPod Touch, man, it’s like getting into a Mercedes after being used to driving a Ford Taurus.

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    3. Very classy guy…

      I don’t think anyone from Android wants to be associated with you.

      “Translated as Apple users have 30 years of taking it up the a$$ so they’re used to it.”

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  6. I think the biggest drawback to iOS development, and why it may ultimately decline in favour of some alternative OS, is the whole Apple ecosystem issue.

    To develop for iOS you need a specific hardware/OS platform (Apple’s), using specific IDE (Apple’s), using an obscure programming language only really adopted by one company (Apple), with a choice of publishing to one location (Apple’s)! Compare that to, say, Android: the developer has a choice of platform (PC/Mac/Linux), on any IDE they like or no IDE, using the most popular programming language in the industry and education, publishing to a range of locations or even side-loadable from a web page.

    If you’re already a developer living inside the Apple eco-system, this isn’t an issue. But a lot of the industry is heavily Windows/Linux orientated. If the industry adopts mobile in the way it adopted the web, there’s going to be a lot of current .NET/JavaEE/LAMP coders moving into the sector over the coming years, and the path of least resistance is clearly WinMobile or Android — NOT APPLE!

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    1. Gosh, thanks for these surprising insights.

      I never knew that you could write .NET on Android, for instance.

      And this “obscure” Apple-only language developers are forced to use… is that why I’m having trouble switching from the other couple of languages I’ve used, to C++? I suppose I could fall back to C, although I’d miss the object-oriented features.

      Regarding being able to avoid using an IDE if you choose: I’d be interested to know what popular Android apps were built with just a text editor and a command-line compiler. I personally haven’t used that type of primitive setup since the early 80′s. I’m awfully curious about how bad an IDE could be to drive people back to such ancient technology. Eclipse is supposedly free for developers; it it as ugly as all that?

      With regard to publishing venues: frankly, as a minor-league developer (not my day job, though I’ve sold a few) I’ve never had the ambition to be a “publisher.” Why would you want to have to maintain apps on multiple sites, pay hosting fees, etc., if your goal is simply to make a few coins or get a neat app into users’ hands? Is Google Marketplace so bad that you can’t just reach your target by dropping it into their hands and let your reputation build from satisfied users?

      Regards having to buy an Apple to develop for iOS, I’m astonished that on your side of the pond (“favour,” not “favor”) you can’t get to eBay to buy used Intel Mac minis for as little as $100 (or roughly £60). That’s too bad, because if your time is worth more than what you pay lavatory attendants there, I hear that you would recoup that minor cost in the first couple dozen code/debug cycles in which you have to load up the painfully slow emulator that Google offers, versus the really snappy simulator that is bundled with the free development kit on any Mac.

      Finally, I note your *conjecture* that Android’s strong market share is going to somehow dramatically shift today’s developer economics. As you imply, they haven’t yet, and from all your other reasons, it can’t be because it’s too hard to get started with Android. Meanwhile, with somewhere around a half million apps for iOS, you’d have to guess that many tens of thousands have picked up iOS, and of course there’s the lopsided income data.

      So I guess my surprise about what seem to be goofball issues and approaches raise more questions. Care to amplify?

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  7. The reason that really matters is Apple’s curated consumer. Buying Apple says something unique about your spending habits. Some (slowly increasing) portion of their base are lifers, but the overwhelming majority are (or could be) in play.

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  8. Why exactly would I feel bad about a $.99 app or even (horrors) a $4.99 app? You must be kidding!

    My girlfriend got an Android, works ok, kind of cheesy and plasticy.

    Has downloaded some free Android apps and abandoned nearly all except for the basic e-mail etc and GasBuddy. Back to her laptop for internet. I have about 20 iOS apps and use 90% at least once a week. She has more dropped calls than I do, like 10 to 1.

    I am an iOS devoper, have no intention of developing any free ones. Why would I do that? $.99 is going to kill you??????????

    “To develop for iOS you need a specific hardware/OS platform (Apple’s), using specific IDE (Apple’s), using an obscure programming language only really adopted by one company (Apple), with a choice of publishing to one location (Apple’s)! Compare that to, say, Android: the developer has a choice of platform (PC/Mac/Linux), on any IDE they like or no IDE, using the most popular programming language in the industry and education, publishing to a range of locations or even side-loadable from a web page.”

    Who wants to develop for chaos? Tools that operate predictably enhance my creativity, not inhibit it!!!! Thats Xcode for you. I know how it will work so I can shine with my apps. Why would I want to get bogged down in all the fragmentation of Android?

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    1. I had a go with xcode once… I’ll die a happy man if I never have to use it again. I’ve never come across a more unpleasent environment in which to write software. Give me a text editor and a command line compiler any day over that constrictive, horrid, shitty piece of trash.

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      1. Oh god I hate dev fake matchoism

        Use the terminal and the xcodebuild command line interface then. Feel free to write code with whatever editor gives you a buzz.

        Nothing says you have you use the GUI for you dev.

        Jeeze

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  9. I see the Android fanboys are up to their usual distortions. Resembles their apps.

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    1. I just died! Couldn’t have said it better ;)

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  10. Im just curious, who gets paid well? iOS dev guy or the android dev guy, both have the same no. of working experience with the same location lets say in UK. Any ideas?

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