Summary:

TaskRabbit, the online marketplace that allows people to outsource errands and other jobs, has debuted its first iPhone app. The whole point of using TaskRabbit is to save precious time, so the iOS app is great — it allows people to get things done on the go.

TaskRabbit founder Leah Busque

TaskRabbit CEO Leah Busque

TaskRabbit, the online marketplace that allows people to outsource errands and other jobs, has debuted its first mobile application for use on Apple’s iPhone and iPod touch devices. The TaskRabbit app will be available in the Apple App Store starting on Thursday.

I’ve been playing around with a preview version of the TaskRabbit app for the past couple days, and I have to say it’s pretty great. The whole point of using TaskRabbit is to save precious time, and the iOS app helps users achieve that end perfectly. Task creators have the benefit of posting errands as they become necessary, wherever that is. And people who are TaskRabbit “runners”– AKA task completers — can pick up jobs that become available around them while they’re on the go.

The user interface is feature-rich and slick, but still easy to navigate. The home page lays out different categories in a roulette wheel format that makes it quite fun to browse for available tasks and post errands. An especially handy feature is the ability to post voice recordings for a task description without having to type. All in all, using the app is a very pleasant experience.

My only qualm about TaskRabbit’s iOS app is that it seems to require a Facebook sign-in, whereas the web application has given people the option of signing in with Facebook or by creating a TaskRabbit account with an email address. Many people aren’t comfortable with linking their social networking profiles to mobile apps, especially when those apps aren’t expressly for interacting with friends and family. Since people often use TaskRabbit to work with strangers, I think it could be best to allow people to easily sign into the service without giving it access to their established social graphs.

TaskRabbit has amassed a dedicated following in the handful of cities in which it is currently available. As I wrote in May, I personally know people here in San Francisco who use it to outsource everything from picking up their dry cleaning to waiting in line for concert tickets. In certain circles, TaskRabbit has actually become a verb: “I’m too busy to pick up more dog food this afternoon. Maybe I’ll just TaskRabbit it.” Now that people can interact with the TaskRabbit marketplace while on the go, we may all be hearing a lot more about the service in the months ahead.

Here are a few screenshots of TaskRabbit for iOS (click to enlarge):

         

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