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Summary:

As mobile devices become more prevalent at work, the need for security continues to rise. WatchDox provides document control, tracking and security features through a web app, apps for iPad and iPhone (we covered it late last year) and now for BlackBerry.

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As mobile devices become more prevalent at work, the need for security continues to rise. WatchDox provides document control, tracking and security features through a web app, apps for iPad and iPhone (we covered it late last year) and now for BlackBerry. WatchDox aims to ease concerns about mobile devices being a risky way to transmit and view sensitive documents by adding a layer of security and control to documents sent through its system.

On the BlackBerry, WatchDox users can render PDF and Microsoft Office. It offers features allowing users to:

  • Share and view documents securely on BlackBerry devices.
  • Restrict shared documents from being copied, printed or forwarded.
  • Eliminate documents remotely, if needed.

The company also announced updates to its Apple iOS app, including:

  • Document sync. Users can securely sync their online documents or their virtual data room folders through the secure app versus less secure consumer-grade syncing methods.
  • Passcode protection. In case of device loss or theft, a passcode provides an additional layer of security against information leaks.
  • Performance enhancements. Access to documents should be speedier.
While there are several subscription levels for WatchDox including Personal, Team and Virtual Data Room, pricing is customized so you’ll need to contact the company for a quote, although general plans typically start at $49.99 per month per user. The company does offer a 14-day free trial.
How are you securing your documents on your mobile devices?

  1. Re your post from last year: Tweeting 101: A Twitter Cheat Sheet

    Not exactly a newbie anymore, but something has always confused me:

    I don’t usually have time to check my timeline — way too much to keep up with and live a normal life — but when I do find some spare minutes, I’ll scan a little and see something comment-worthy from an hour, maybe two, or three hours before. If I want to reply, how does the Tweeter know to what I’m replying if s/he has tweeted a bunch of Tweets in the interim? Do slow-mos like me just continue to resort to DMs, or has Twitter cordoned off a Reply Room for Slow-Mos in our accounts (accessible by clicking our heels 3X)?

    Thank you.

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  2. [EDIT: Please ignore that Reply Room comment. Doesn't make sense.]

    What I think Twitter should do is auto-attach a Tweet to the reply that triggers it. There. That’ll do it.

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