Summary:

By 2016, more than 2.1 billion mobile devices will have HTML5 browsers, up from just 109 million in 2010. ABI Research predicts that roughly one-third of the world’s population will have a capable HTML5 browser in their pocket in five years or less. It’s true that […]

By 2016, more than 2.1 billion mobile devices will have HTML5 browsers, up from just 109 million in 2010.

ABI Research predicts that roughly one-third of the world’s population will have a capable HTML5 browser in their pocket in five years or less. It’s true that today, mobile app downloads are driving upwards fast; Apple recently reported 15 billion app downloads from its iTunes App Store, for example. But of course, those apps can only run on iOS devices. Developers wanting to target other platforms have to port the apps or use third-party cross-platform tools, such as the tools from RhoMobile, Titanium or others.

In contrast, mature web apps built on HTML5 standards could effectively be written one time and run on a far greater range of devices with less modification. This doesn’t signal the end of the explosive app economy, but it does show that there might be more than one way to arrive at a profitable mobile destination.

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