2 Comments

Summary:

First LulzSec took over The Sun’s homepage, then it took down the rest of News International’s sites. Now it appears that the hackers are wo…

Hacked Sun
photo: LulzSec

First LulzSec took over The Sun’s homepage, then it took down the rest of News International‘s sites. Now it appears that the hackers are working with the hacks. The hacking group LulzSec says that it is planning to release some of the emails it has picked up related to the News of the World, exclusively, via “certain media outlets.” But at the same time, another hacking group AnonymousIRC, earlier on said it will not release any emails related to The Sun for fear of compromising the court case.

The plan to share emails with the media was revealed by LulzSec via its Twitter account:

{tweet_id=”94033541196824576″}

It’s unclear from the tweet, but these emails may be part of the trove that LulzSec claimed to have nabbed when it breached News International’s security walls the other day, as part of its attack on the company.

We’ve sent out questions to LulzSec about who these outlets may be — and what criteria it used in making its decision. Money? Audience reach? Ideology?

What makes LulzSec’s statement a little confusing is that earlier in the day, its cohort in hacking another hacking group, Anonymous, said it had decided against sending out emails from The Sun staff, for fear of compromising any legal actions (description updated after a comment from reader “anon” below):

{tweet_id=”94012373748285440″}

LulzSec and AnonymousIRC earlier today also sent out an open letter to the FBI, following reports that some of its members had been arrested. In it, the groups railed against what it deemed corrupt governments and corprorations:

“And we will continue to fight them, with all methods we have at our disposal, and that certainly includes breaking into their websites and exposing their lies. We are not scared any more.”

Emails have proven to be a central and key piece of evidence in the scandal that has hit NI and its owner News Corporation (NSDQ: NWS), as a potential record and trail of hacking orders, payments and route to cover them up. They could also provide clues to who else was targeted by the hacks and who else, such as corrupt police, may have been involved in hacking and other illegal means used to get stories.

Until now, the media has not had access to those mails, just an idea of some of the details that they may have contained. If LulzSec walks the walk on this one, they could kick this whole News International story up another gear.

You’re subscribed! If you like, you can update your settings

  1. Ingrid Lunden Thursday, July 21, 2011

    Anon-description updated. Thanks.

Comments have been disabled for this post