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Summary:

Spotify’s journey to the US has been highly anticipated almost since the on-demand music streaming service first launched in its native Europe in October 2008. But with all the Spotify buzz, let’s not forget about the great music services that were born here in the US.

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Spotify’s journey to the U.S. has been highly anticipated almost since the on-demand music-streaming service first launched in its native Europe in October 2008. And with good reason: Spotify is really cool. Now that the service is finally available here, American audiences are getting to see firsthand what all the hype has been about.

But with all the buzz about Spotify, let’s not forget about the great music services that were born in the USA. How do they measure up to the Sweden-bred Spotify, which has amassed more than 10 million users in Europe alone, more than 1 million of whom are paid subscribers?

Here’s a look at a few of the more popular ones:

  • MOG
    Headquarters: Berkeley, Calif.
    Founded: June 2005
    What it is: An ad-free subscription on-demand music service and an online radio service.
    How big is it? MOG does not provide user or subscription figures. What we do know is that MOG has raised $25 million in venture capital and has 11 million songs in its library.
  • Pandora
    Headquarters: Oakland, Calif.
    Founded: January 2000
    What it is: A personalized Internet radio service available in a free, ad-supported version and a subscription-based, ad-free version.
    How big is it? Pandora has more than 90 million registered users, according to recent regulatory filings. The company collected $137 million in revenue in its most recent fiscal year, and it has a relatively limited library consisting of 800,000 songs. Pandora is publicly traded on the NYSE and currently has a market cap of $2.8 billion.
  • Rhapsody
    Headquarters: Seattle, Wash.
    Founded: December 2001
    What it is: An on-demand subscription music service, Rhapsody started with a catalog consisting of mostly classical music, but it now spans all genres.
    How big is it? Rhapsody has more than 800,000 paying subscribers and more than 12 million songs in its library, according to a recent PaidContent report. The company has not disclosed any revenue figures since it spun out of Real Networks in 2010 with an $18 million initial investment, but it reportedly expects to become profitable this year.
  • Slacker Radio
    Headquarters: San Diego, Calif.
    Founded: 2004; launched March 2007
    What it is: An interactive Internet radio service with social-networking features, Slacker recently launched a paid on-demand music-streaming feature as well.
    How big is it? Slacker has between 3 million to 5 million users, around 300,000 to 400,000 of whom are paying subscribers, according to a recent report by North County Times. The company has raised $73 million in venture capital and has more than 8 million songs in its library.

This is by no means a comprehensive list but rather a snapshot of a few music services that have been available in the U.S. from day one. If you have any personal favorites, please chime in using the comments.

Image courtesy of Flickr user mrsdkrebs

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  1. ZunePass?

  2. You missed the best US music since Lala: http://Rdio.com

  3. Heaven forbid Americans have to use services from outside the US!

  4. http://earbits.com Great service for discovery and streaming of hot up & coming bands

  5. Yawn – Another music service, streaming/subscription at that.
    Bring on the next shiny tech object, this ones already old.

  6. Spotify has one real competitor, which also happens to be based in the US. It’s called Rdio http://rdio.com and it’s amazing to me that it wasn’t mentioned anywhere in this article.

    1. Thanks for the comment Jon.

      You’re absolutely right about Rdio, which I do like a lot. Mentally, I think I may have overlooked it because of its European investors. A mistake on my part. I’m going to look into doing an update of this list, and Rdio certainly deserves a spot.

      1. I’d love to see a side-by-side comparison of the two services (or all of them). I think something like that would be of great interest and would probably get a lot of reads/traffic.

        I do enjoy your writing on GigaOM :) Keep up the great work!

  7. How can people keep forgetting grooveshark.com? I think that grooveshark does such a massive job, I have no idea how they are tackling the legal issues, but it has been online for quite some time and I can even stream it in Germany!

  8. Is this article for real? Do you seriously want to introduce a patriotism/nationalism element into debate about web services?

    1. Colleen Taylor Tom Friday, July 15, 2011

      Not at all, Tom. With all the news about Spotify’s US launch, I wanted to take a look at the business landscape the company has entered into. This is just a short list of some of similar services that have been targeted to US audiences for years now, and how many users they’ve amassed.

      1. If so, what’s the point of labeling the list with “Made in America” slogan and excluding services that are not US based, yet are targeted to the same US audiences?

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