Summary:

Less than a day after the Federal Trade Commission launched a wide-ranging probe into Google’s core search and advertising business, the big…

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Less than a day after the Federal Trade Commission launched a wide-ranging probe into Google’s core search and advertising business, the biggest U.S. states have piled on, saying they’ll launch their own investigations. Meanwhile, Google (NSDQ: GOOG) published a defense this morning, saying it will cooperate with the FTC and that its search business is all about serving users first.

In a post published this morning on the official Google blog, the company publicly acknowledged the FTC investigation. “We respect the FTC’s process and will be working with them (as we have with other agencies) over the coming months to answer questions about Google and our services,” writes Google Fellow Amit Singhal.

He adds that “it’s still unclear exactly what the FTC’s concerns are, but we’re clear about where we stand,” before continuing on to a list of principles that guide Google’s search business-such as transparency, data portability, clearly labeling advertisement, and providing the most relevant results for users.

The company also disclosed the investigation in an SEC filing this morning.

The FTC isn’t the only government body that Google will be opening up to in the near future. Attorneys general from California, New York, and Ohio have launched antitrust investigations into Google as well, according to a report published today in the Financial Times. That’s in addition to an ongoing investigation brought by the Texas AG. Both Google and state authorities declined to comment on those investigations.

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