Summary:

Cloud-management platform provider RightScale is launching a service to help customers manage private and hybrid clouds similar to what RightScale customer Zynga does with its vaunted Z Cloud infrastructure. Hybrid cloud computing is hot, and MyCloud might represent a better way of thinking about the model.

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Cloud-management platform provider RightScale is launching a new service to help customers manage private and hybrid clouds similar to what RightScale customer Zynga does with its vaunted Z Cloud infrastructure. Hybrid cloud computing appears to be the end-game for many companies’ cloud strategies right now, and RightScale’s new MyCloud service might represent an ideal way of thinking about the model.

RightScale’s new offering provides the proverbial single pane of glass through which to manage private-cloud infrastructure based on either Eucalyptus Systems or Cloud.com as well as public cloud-based resources that are managed via RightScale. And although Zynga built its RightScale-based cloud setup from scratch, RightScale CEO Michael Crandell said it offers what might be the ideal model for doing hybrid cloud computing. Rather than focusing on simple cloudbursting, which Crandell calls “naive” in certain situations, Zynga honed in on standardization as a focus of its cloud efforts.

By utilizing standard server templates, Zynga is able to stage, test and launch games in Amazon EC2, then easily migrate them to its private cloud when the time comes by launching a cluster of identically configured servers in-house. Last week, RightScale opened its MultiCloud Marketplace, which is like an app store for infrastructure configurations that features a wide range of templates for everything from web servers to Hadoop clusters. With MyCloud, users can now create their own Zynga-like experience by utilizing Marketplace templates on private cloud infrastructure as well as in the public cloud.

Another use case for MyCloud, Crandell said, might be to spread different components of an application architectures across both public and private resources. Depending on bandwidth costs and the need for high-speed interconnects, it might make sense for certain parts (e.g., an on-demand processing engine) to run in the public cloud while others remain on premise.

Crandell will be present at Structure 2011, being held June 22-23 in San Francisco, to discuss the future of cloud application platforms and what issues they’ll need to address as mainstream interest picks up. MyCloud is currently available for free through an early access program, although more-functional, and paid, Standard and Enterprise versions are on the way.

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