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Summary:

Mark Zuckerberg gets a lot of attention for founding Facebook, but if it were up to him, his employees would be joining him on more of the magazine covers. At a recent conference, Zuckerberg said lavishing credit on a successful company’s founder is a big mistake.

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Mark Zuckerberg gets a lot of attention for founding Facebook, but if it were up to him, his employees would be joining him on more of the magazine covers and television features.

In an onstage conversation with venture capitalist John Doerr at this week’s NewSchools-Aspen Institute Summit 2011 conference, Zuckerberg said lavishing credit on a successful company’s founder is a big mistake.

“One of those things that the media just constantly gets wrong is this idea that it’s a person. It’s never a person. It’s always a team.

The most important thing for you as an entrepreneur trying to build something is, you need to build a really good team. And that’s what I spend all my time on… I spend probably 25 percent of my time recruiting, finding good people, both outside the company and inside the company, to put them in more impactful roles.”

It’s understandable that some CEOs enjoy taking credit for a company’s good times, since they’re also the ones who will ultimately be held responsible for any failures — the whole greater risk, greater reward philosophy. But as Facebook’s largest single shareholder, Zuckerberg already stands to gain the most financially from the company’s success. Maybe that’s why he wouldn’t mind sharing more of the accolades with the other people who have built the company with him.

  1. It’s true it takes a team but teams/companies are faceless – Need a face, an identifier and it’s many times the founder. IBM (Watson), HP (Hewlett & Packard), Intel (Grove), Apple (Jobs & Woz) — Sometimes the face is made up. General Mills (Betty Crocker) etc.

  2. Does Facebook pay you to write this drivel?

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