Summary:

You’ve seen the stories about how Twitter was used to break the news on Osama bin Laden’s death, and the huge effect the event has had on In…

Osama Bin Laden on newspaper
photo: Getty Images / Mario Tama

You’ve seen the stories about how Twitter was used to break the news on Osama bin Laden’s death, and the huge effect the event has had on Internet traffic, with news websites reporting record-breaking traffic yesterday (read more on the Internet traffic spike here). Well, it turns out that impact has been felt right across the communications board, right down to mobile:

A graphic released from Sybase 365, which provides real-time mobile analytics to mobile operators, shows how the news of Bin Laden’s death coincided with a big spike in SMS traffic — presumably as people messaged each other to pass on the information.

The U.S., which first saw the news on Sunday evening, saw a spike of 18 percent in a 30-minute timespan.

In Asia, where it was daytime when the news broke (and which happens to have some of the highest SMS use in the world at the moment), the spike was even bigger. Singapore saw the biggest spike, 85 percent; Australia’s traffic spiked 53 percent; Thailand’s SMS traffic went up 44 percent and Indonesia’s 15 percent.

Here’s the detail of the overall spike:

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