Summary:

NPD has released its quarterly results for mobile phones sales in the U.S. among consumers: smartphones are now outselling feature phones, a…

NPD has released its quarterly results for mobile phones sales in the U.S. among consumers: smartphones are now outselling feature phones, and while Apple (NSDQ: AAPL) is only ranking at number-three across all mobile devices, its iPhone 4 is the best-selling single device. Meanwhile, Android has slipped in the rankings for the first time in nearly two years.

In its quarterly “Mobile Phone Track”, NPD notes that Samsung has remained as the top-selling brand across the whole spectrum of mobile handsets. The Korean company, which makes devices using Android, Windows Phone 7 and its own proprietary OS, maintained a comfortable lead with 23 percent of all sales. LG (SEO: 066570) took second place with 18 percent. Meanwhile, NPD notes that the addition of the iPhone to Verizon’s network has boosted Apple’s share up to 14 percent, giving it third position.

That boost from Verizon seemed to do something else, too: it gave the iPhone 4 the leg up it needed to become the best-selling single device in the country. It was followed up by its older version, the iPhone 3GS; third place went to another Verizon phone, the Motorola (NYSE: MMI) Droid X; fourth and fifth to two HTC devices, the EVO 4G, and Droid Incredible.

Despite projections for the continuing growth of the Android OS, NPD says that this quarter is the first time that Android as a collective OS has slipped in the rankings: down to a mere 50 percent of all smartphone sales versus 53 percent the quarter before. This is the first decline in the OS since Q2 2009.

But despite this, smartphones as a group is still growing: this is the first quarter that smartphone sales have actually exceeded that of feature phones in the U.S., at 54 percent of all sales. Sales of smartphones increased by eight percent.

Looking across the whole spectrum of mobile devices, the average selling price has gone up — but only just. It’s up two percent to $102. But the huge amount of price competition among operators keen to pick up smartphone users has actually led to a decrease in the ASP of mobile devices: they were down three percent to $145. Not long before those two numbers actually converge, methinks.

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