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Summary:

YouTube founders Chad Hurley and Steve Chen have acquired Delicious, but it sounds like they have something much bigger in mind than just maintaining the service. So what could Delicious become? The key is information discovery, one of the meatiest problems in media right now.

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Yahoo said today that it isn’t killing its Delicious social-bookmarking service after all, as some suspected it might when it was included on a list of Yahoo assets marked for “sunsetting” late last year. Instead Yahoo is selling the service to Chad Hurley and Steve Chen, two of the co-founders of YouTube. Although the new buyers say they are planning to maintain the service as is, it also sounds like they have something much bigger in mind — and they obviously know a thing or two about building a small service into a major web property. So what could Delicious become? The key to answering that question is information discovery, one of the meatiest problems in media right now.

In a statement about the acquisition, Hurley and Chen’s new company (known as AVOS) hinted at this future by saying that their plan is to “build a world-class team to take on the challenge of building the best information-discovery service on the web.” The company also said that it wants to solve the problem of information overload, which is a problem “not just in the world of video, but also cutting across every information-intensive media type,” according to Chen. Hurley left YouTube last October, and Chen left in 2009.

So how could a bookmark-sharing service — which never really cracked the mainstream web-user market when it was a standalone business run by founder Josh Schachter, and didn’t come any closer to big time adoption after its acquisition by Yahoo in 2005 — solve that problem? The answer lies in how we consume information now, and how that is changing. One of the biggest changes is the social nature of content; how we share it and also discover it via social networks such as Twitter and Facebook, and the increasing amounts of content coming not just from those networks but from apps and services like Instagram.

In many ways, services such as Instapaper and Evernote and Twitter’s favorite feature have taken over the space where Delicious used to be a player: they are all ways of keeping track of those web links and photos and other bits of data that we don’t want to lose as the real-time information stream flows past us at a hundred miles an hour. But they are disconnected from each other — my Instapaper doesn’t know that I favorited something on Twitter, and vice versa. Evernote is close to being a “backup brain” in that sense, but there is still plenty of room to solve that problem of tracking what we have read and shared, and helping us make sense of it. This also arguably something that Google should have — or could have — done using its RSS reader as a foundation, but hasn’t.

And so far, even the existing players have only started to scratch the surface of what they could do in terms of information discovery and smart recommendation, which I have argued in the past is the Holy Grail of media. Instapaper has added features that let you share with others, and see what your friends have shared, and that’s a step in the direction of discovery; so is News.me letting you look over the shoulder of others as they read, and Zite’s explicit recommendations.

But think about the vast amount of content that has already been sucked in by Delicious over the years — arguably the single biggest asset that the company has, and the one Hurley and Chen were likely willing to pay up for. Those millions of shared bookmarks are a kind of social graph of content in a way: they are implicit signals from all the people who shared those links, or stored them for later, that there is valuable content there. Some of those links may be dead or changed, but it’s still a fairly substantial foundation for an information-discovery service to build on.

Search Engine Land says that Hurley and Chen might be trying to take on Google, and in a sense they are: the way we find information is changing, and Google is trying to catch up to those changes too. It’s mostly failing so far. The new kings of social information discovery are Twitter and Facebook — and the Delicious acquisition is a sign that YouTube’s former founders would like to join that race.

Thumbnail photo courtesy of Flickr user retinafunk

  1. So the delicious of tomorrow will be like the http://trunk.ly of today? It’s great validation of what we’re working towards. Social search is not just about normal search layered with social results, it’s the ability to search groups of experts for the best content that they are sharing. Feel free to check out trunk.ly if you want to see this in action now.

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  2. Mathew,
    Re: “my Instapaper doesn’t know that I favorited something on Twitter, and vice versa.” Actually, you can do this with Eqentia’s Personal Stream. You sync it to your Twitter Favorites and Google Reader starred or shared folders, and see the content appear there, same as Instapaper. You can read it later or even share it with everybody publicly in a magazine-like format. Plus, you can email any article to it, or even grab any web page you’re coming across, and there’s more.

    Regarding discovery, there’s two types: serendipitous and targeted. Twitter, FB & LinkedIn or sharing sites give the first one, but a system like Eqentia can give you a targeted discovery. Both approaches are useful, but the starting points are different.

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  3. I’ve come to like Twitter more in the last year, but even that can be an information overload. Paper.li has been great for viewing twitter information in a different format. It will be interesting to see exactly how they turn Delicious into something that will grab everyone’s attention.

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  4. “…wants to solve the problem of information overload…”

    I had to chuckle at that claim. Extreme statements like this pop up a red flag for me. Everything in the world happens incrementally. But I really want bad for them to please try, try, try!

    Furthermore, attempts to “synergize” things have a tough time being successful because each of the independent players will resist being blended in and “disappeared” from view and having their identity stripped away or blurred.

    There are so many elements involved that it makes my head hurt when I try to fantasize about generalized solutions, and I think about this a lot.

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  5. “This also arguably something that Google should have — or could have — done using its RSS reader as a foundation, but hasn’t.”

    But we still hope they will.

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  6. Let’s hope the reinvented Delicious does take us one step further to simplifying the process of information discovery. That said, discovering information is only one piece of the equation. Various streams of information are great but where’s the context that wraps all of those streams together and makes sense out of them? Call it connecting the dots or context, this to me is the key to really making something meaningful out of all of this data. As cynical as we are about the media, they have served this purpose at times, sometimes even getting it right (Disclosure: former journalist). So what’s the next evolution in this process? Mathew I’d really like to hear more of your thoughts on this topic. Thanks.

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  7. I agree with Tim. This describes the current Trunk.ly experience perfectly for me:
    “a kind of social graph of content in a way: they are implicit signals from all the people who shared those links, or stored them for later, that there is valuable content there. “

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  8. “In many ways, services such as Instapaper and Evernote and Twitter’s favorite feature have taken over the space where Delicious used to be a player: they are all ways of keeping track of those web links and photos and other bits of data that we don’t want to lose as the real-time information stream flows past us at a hundred miles an hour. ”

    Actually, no. Delicious is all about information archiving _and_ discovery.
    Evernote is for _rich_ information archiving, not for discovery. Instapaper is for longform information archiving and Twitter is for fast information discovery.
    They are quite different and in many instances can be used as complementary services, provided one invests some time and effort in trying them out and understanding their pros and cons.

    nda

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  9. I’ve seen Delicious reference before–even before the acquisition note I saw in the last couple of days–but I’d never actually bothered to see what it was about. I suppose that, too, is thanks to information overload. “Another link to clink? Great.”

    I’m interested in the handling and communication of data, but it’s generally an abstract interest. This entry was fascinating to me, so it’s perhaps time to start delving deeper. Thanks!

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  10. As a writer, Delicious has been a great organizational tool for me (especially while traveling) but it really lacks any sort of social interconnectivity, as you’ve said. Any improvement is something to look forward to.

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