Summary:

Our look at some of the big stories in mobile today: as news of Apple’s tracking data emerges, Nielsen reveals some privacy stats; details t…

Internet Privacy - spy - computer - magnifying glass
photo: Corbis / Stanley Eales

Our look at some of the big stories in mobile today: as news of Apple’s tracking data emerges, Nielsen reveals some privacy stats; details trickle on Amazon’s new tablet; HP (NYSE: HPQ) starts getting operators for its new handsets, starting with the diminutive Veer

Mobile privacy: As we hear about the latest discovery of how smartphones (in this case, the iPhone) tracks our every move, Nielsen has made a very timely release of some research it has conducted on mobile privacy. It turns out that women are more concerned than men are about location data: 59 percent compared to 52 percent. And the older the user, the more likely that person is about revealing the data:

The most important point in the above table, perhaps, is that at least 50 percent of respondents in any age category are “concerned” about their location data.

Those who understand how mobile networks, and location-based services, work will know that the disclosure of personal location information is a basic part of these services. But perhaps this is a message to the industry that it is not explaining how this works well enough to the average user — something that might turn out the bite them in the end.

Amazon (NSDQ: AMZN) tablet: More pundits are throwing their hats into the still-unconfirmed speculation pool surrounding the Amazon-branded tablet. The latest educated guess: the device will be manufactured by Samsung, and it will be built on an older version of Android (not Honeycomb) and optimised to run Amazon services, according to Peter Rojas of GDGT. He also thinks it could come out as soon as this summer, priced at under $400.

HP Veer: Some distribution deals are starting to emerge for HP’s new porfolio of smartphones and tablets. Among them, the Veer is going to get sold by O2 in Germany, come June, according to PreCentral. That may well be extended to the rest of O2′s footprint in Europe, too: O2 was Palm’s launch partner in the region for its groundbreaking (but ultimately only so-so selling) Pre.

Comments have been disabled for this post