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Summary:

The Xoom tablet has been largely thought of as the most credible Android tablet competitor to the Apple (NSDQ: AAPL) iPad. But apparently, t…

Motorola Atrix (landscape)

The Xoom tablet has been largely thought of as the most credible Android tablet competitor to the Apple (NSDQ: AAPL) iPad. But apparently, this doesn’t mean it’s selling as well as its rival product. And Moto’s exciting new Atrix handset — the one that effectively takes the place of a netbook when you plug it into a screen accessory? It’s not doing much better.

These conclusions come from a research note from Pacific Crest analyst James Faucette (via Forbes), who writes that sales of both have been “disappointing” and “well below forecast.” His data comes from checks with Moto’s retail channels.

Deutsche Bank goes one further and gives a number to the Xoom non-boom: just 100,000 devices since launch (via Business Insider). Its researchers based that figure on stats on the Android developer site, and looking at Honeycomb user numbers. As a point of comparison, people have been guessing that the iPad 2 has sold as much as 500,000 in its opening days (with no actual numbers ever confirmed by Apple or any retail partners).

The Atrix’s main problem, according to Pacific Crest’s Faucette, seems to be competition from the older iPhone 3GS and the HTC Inspire, which are both priced at $49.

Meanwhile, the Xoom has had to contend with a very competitively priced — and media loved-up — new iPad 2, even as the device has faced supply shortages.

Faucette has cut his 2011 revenue forecast for Motorola (NYSE: MMI) Mobility to $12.2 billion from $13.7 billion and notes that there could be more risk if the company doesn’t come out with a “refresh” in its product line for the second half of the year.

That conclusion is slightly alarming, considering the R&D effort that Motorola has to put into the Xoom, and no doubt the rest of its Android products — the video below gives a glimpse of that.

Suddenly this chatter about Motorola looking at its own OS (or something to put on top of an Android OS) sounds a lot more plausible.

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  1. I’m sorry, it is not the iPhone 4G or the HTC Inspire 4G that are undercutting the Atrix’s selling. The Atrix is a great phone that is crippled by stupid company policies that aggravate customers.

    Things(I think)aggravate customers in order of salience:

    1)The LOCKED BOOTLOADER that Motorola installs to prevent users from customizing their expensive phone to their liking. (Petition to remove here: http://goo.gl/5vIQz)

    2)AT&T preventing the sideloading of apps.

    3)AT&T falsely advertising and restricting 4G network speeds.

    1. I don’t think so.

      1) Most consumers don’t know what a “locked bootloader” is
      2) AT&T preventing app side-loading hasn’t prevented the iPhone from selling in huge numbers
      3) The iPhone 4 and 3GS are 3G devices, and again, they sell in huge numbers

      Step back and try again.

      1. Nah, the iPhone sells cause it is “cool” Android sells because either 1) it is cheaper or 2) because geeks like it and want to make the most of their new tech. Early adopters of high capacity phones are likely to be the folks who have greater tech. experience and who want to hack it creating a highly usable hacking ecosystem for all non-hackers like me.

        “Step Back”  ha you iPhone Apple fanboi, your just sore you don’t have a dual core beast with a gig of ram and still need to connect your phone to a pc to do anything major.

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