6 Comments

Summary:

Plaxo is refocusing its efforts on its address book product, and has announced the availability of the Plaxo Personal Assistant, a new service that can intelligently makes automatic updates to the Plaxo address book to keep contact information relevant and up-to date.

addressbook

Plaxo was one of the first companies to offer a unified online address book that connected to and synchronized with all the different address books people use to store contact info: email clients, LinkedIn, Facebook, etc. More recently, however, many innovative “social CRM” competitors have moved into the address book space, like Gist, Connected and Soocial, while Plaxo tinkered with a social networking product called Pulse. The company has announced that it’s refocusing on its address book product, and has released the Plaxo Personal Assistant, a new service that intelligently makes automatic updates to the Plaxo address book to keep contact information relevant and current.

The Personal Assistant is an add-on service that can:

  • Intelligently update inaccurate info. It recognizes outdated contact info, intelligently sources updates, and recommends changes.
  • Complete missing details. It can assist in identifying partial entries and proactively locating current information to fill any gaps.
  • Cleans duplicate entries. It merges contact info between corresponding entries and removes duplicates to help organize your address book.

The product also includes access to change tracking and 24/7 support.

That all sounds pretty useful, but the new service is not particularly cheap: it costs an additional $79.95 per year (the basic Plaxo service itself is free). You should also note that in order for the Personal Assistant to work its magic, it will need process your contact data, which may make some folks uncomfortable; you can view Plaxo’s data usage policy here.

Photo courtesy Flickr user HeyRocker

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  1. “…Plaxo will need to process your data..,” and is owned by Comcast. Just sayin…

  2. @Rafe from CNET does a great job of comparing Hiya’s release last week from WhitePages to Plaxo’s new release http://cnet.co/hN2QiX. Will be interesting to see the innovation in this space after almost 10 years.

  3. Preston Smalley Thursday, March 17, 2011

    @Michele – Agreed that @Rafe from CNET article’s got a good balanced view of the products available. We’ve got a new leadership team here @Plaxo and hope you give our new services a spin as I think they’re pretty innovative. We like to think of our 9 year heretage as showing staying power in the space and also expertise in dealing with contact info. As for Whitepages.com (behind Hiya)–they were founded in 1996.

    @P While @Plaxo is owned as an independant subsidiary of Comcast, we have architected our whole system around protection of privacy, data integrity, and user control. You can learn more here: http://www.plaxo.com/datausage

    Thanks!
    Preston Smalley, GM @ Plaxo.com

  4. http://www.contactgorilla.com is a good free alternative to the paid plaxo. Basically you can use sites like scrubly, gist, hiya, etc. to get the most out of freely available public data info. But as a last step you can use Contact Gorilla to directly ask contacts for info updates. CG is discreet in that it only asks contacts one time for updates. It also helps clean out those bounced addresses.

  5. exogenynetwork Monday, March 21, 2011

    “heretage?!?” How did that get past spell check?
    LOL @ Preston Smalley, GM @ Plaxo.com!!
    Hopefully the “proactive” data gap minder bot program that you will crawl the web with uses spell check. “The horse says, “Doctorate Denied.”

    1. I asked myself the same question. Right after I posted it I saw the misspelling but there is no way to edit comments (like you can using Discus) that I can see.

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