Summary:

Android application discovery continues to be a challenge, but apps abound to help the situation. The lastest — App Hunter — focuses solely on free and reduced priced software in the Android Market. Updated daily, the software finds apps and then points you to the official Android Market.

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Android application discovery continues to be a challenge, but apps abound to help the situation. The latest, App Hunter, focuses solely on free and reduced priced software in the Android Market. The application just launched today, as noted by Download Squad, and I was quick to give it a spin. While it won’t help Android users locate that hard-to-find software, it excels at providing a list of low-priced and free applications for Android devices.

The premise behind App Hunter is simple: On a daily basis, a back-end database scours the Android Market for free titles as well as those recently reduced in price. The app then displays its findings in a simple, three-tabbed interface sorting software by price reductions, the hottest free apps and the newest free titles. Sometimes simplicity is the best solution for a problem and App Hunter is nothing if not simple.

App Hunter’s functionality ends there, and that’s a good thing. Tapping on a title simply takes you to the official Android Market, so App Hunter doesn’t deliver any apps; it only hunts down the deals and points you to the proper download destination. Each of App Hunter’s findings provides the app icon, the title, a short description and the number of downloads for a particular piece of software. I’ll have to see how the daily updates work — after all, the app only launched today — but for now, App Hunter just grabbed a valuable piece of real estate on my Android home screen.

Of course, with the recent malware app attack on Android handsets, it becomes even more important to pay attention to the application permissions that software will gain. Finding an app through App Hunter, or directly through the Android Market, for that matter, doesn’t imply the app is safe. While Google surely needs to clamp down on this potential security issue, it’s ultimately up to each phone user to be cognizant of what phone functionality a piece of software has.

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