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Summary:

TuneUp is software that helps you organize your iTunes library. The makers of TuneUp just secured an additional $2 million in funding, which they plan to use to add features and stay relevant in a world where, more and more, music lives in the cloud.

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If, like me, you’re obsessed with keeping your iTunes library organized, neat and complete, then chances are you’ve turned to TuneUp to help manage the task. The Mac and PC iTunes companion application just secured an additional $2 million in funding, bringing its Series C funding total to $6.3 million. This latest investment comes from IDG Ventures, which has prior investments in the company.

I got a chance to pick the brain of TuneUp’s CEO and founder, Gabe Adiv, to discuss his company’s plan for the application’s future, and how it sees its role shifting as content moves to the cloud. Despite TuneUp’s role as a local media organizational tool, Adiv isn’t fazed by the prospect of a growing shift to store media remotely, rather than on a user’s own local machine.

Adiv plans to use this latest round of funding to grow the team behind TuneUp, with the ultimate goal being the introduction of new features and additional products:

TuneUp will soon be releasing what we believe to be the most intelligent track de-duplicator on the market and are aggressively pursuing opportunities with lyrics. Beyond that there are a number of ways that we feel we can bring real value to various cloud-based eco-systems. Videos are definitely something we are thinking about as well.

While he wouldn’t go into too much detail about the specific ways his company intends to address a cloud-based shift, he did suggest that end-users will still have to deal with improper track naming and sorting through duplications when they move their existing libraries online. Such libraries, Adiv noted, aren’t going anywhere just because music subscription services are arriving on the scene. “Personal music collections and music subscription services are not mutually exclusive,” he told me. “They’ll need to play nicely together in order to provide the most seamless consumption experience.” That definitely rings true to me. I’d never give up my personal collection, even if I did sign up for a subscription service, no matter the depth of its content library.

He also hopes to re-invest some money in marketing efforts in order to increase TuneUp’s visibility. I asked him about the Mac App Store, which seems so far to have had a positive effect on the visibility of other Mac software. Adiv said simply that right now they’re in the process of “figuring out the best way to present their offerings” in that venue.

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  1. I also love TAGALICIOUS to help keep my library organized.

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