Summary:

Lost in the wake of Membase and CouchOne merging to form Couchbase, and far away from Silicon Valley, Boston-based NoSQL startup Basho has raised $7.5 million for its efforts to commercialize the Riak NoSQL database, according to a report in Mass High Tech.

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Lost in the wake of Membase and CouchOne merging to form Couchbase, and far away from Silicon Valley, Boston-based NoSQL startup Basho has raised $7.5 million for its efforts to commercialize the Riak NoSQL database, according to a report in Mass High Tech. The article cites D.C.-area equity firm Georgetown Partners and Danish systems integrator Trifork AS as the investors, and says Basho has amassed “at least $17.5 million” in total financing; Crunchbase has Basho’s total at $10.9 million. Whatever the total, it’s more money being poured into a fast-maturing NoSQL market, and more money for Basho to push Riak as an alternative to NoSQL mindshare leaders Cassandra, CouchDB and MongoDB.

With the new money, Basho actually is roughly on par with its competition in terms of financing. MongoDB peddler 10gen has raised $11.4 million thus far (including a $6.5 million round in December), and although CouchOne only raised $2 million for its CouchDB efforts, it has merged itself with Membase and that company’s $15 million in funds. Cassandra champion DataStax (formerly Riptano) just raised its first $2.7 million in October. Basho has attracted some noteworthy customers, too, including Comcast , Wikia and Opscode, and last spring, Mozilla chose Riak over Cassandra and HBase as the foundation its Mozilla Labs Test Pilot project that analyzes large amounts of Firefox-user data.

A big question surrounding NoSQL still is whether most organizations will be willing to implement several NoSQL options for several different tasks, or whether they’ll settle on one as a complement to their relational databases and adapt the NoSQL database to fit whatever tasks it might logically support. If the former is the case, there might be room for all these vendors at the table, but if the latter ends up as reality, the type of merger we saw yesterday might become more common. It will be a lot easier to get attention as one of a few vendors rather than being one of several vendors, and a consolidation of developers around fewer projects could spur the pace of innovation. Should we be on the lookout for BashoStax in the months to come?

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