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Summary:

Norman Nie helped create SPSS, one of the first companies to take advantage of the data computers enabled researchers and businesses to track. He spoke with me about why we need to speak to our data and how that conversation can change the way we innovate.

norman

Norman Nie helped create SPSS, one of the first companies to take advantage of the massive amounts of data that computers enabled researchers and businesses to track. After almost 40 years at SPSS, which was later acquired by IBM, Nie re-focused his energy on academia. But in 2009 he was pulled out of his Ivory Tower by the challenge of building a business around the open source R language at Revolution Analytics. Now as CEO and chairman, Nie is evangelizing Revolution R as a modern replacement to SPSS, SAS and other older statistical analysis languages.

In the video below, he talked about why we need to speak to our data and how that conversation can change the way we innovate and do business.

He also covers the changes that have taken place in his 40-odd years of working with data. Essentially, the introduction of scalable architectures such as Hadoop and cheaper computing have enabled people to look at data in real time. Combine that with a means of analyzing it, such as Revolution R, and it’s possible to offer people who aren’t statisticians a way to interact with big data and use that information to inform their daily decision-making. For the full story, watch the video, and make plans to come see Lee Edlefsen, chief scientist at Revolution Analytics, at our Structure Big Data conference taking place on March 23 in New York City.

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