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Summary:

The mobile music space has just picked up a bit more capital: Rdio, music discovery and sharing startup, has raised financing from Mangrove…

The mobile music space has just picked up a bit more capital: Rdio, music discovery and sharing startup, has raised financing from Mangrove Capital Partners. Rdio was founded by Niklas Zennstrom and Janus Friis, pictured, who had also created Skype and Joost and file sharing site Kazaa.

The news was first picked up by the blog Quintura, based on a tweet from Mangrove partner Mark Tluszcz to MC Hammer (yes, that’s right). We have confirmed the news with Mangrove itself.

The actual amount of financing has not been confirmed — we have asked for more details on that, as well as how the financing might get used. The service is currently only available in the U.S. and Canada but the plan is to extend that to other markets, too.

Rdio, which lets users discover, listen to and share music, and works both on and offline, has apps for iPhone, Android and BlackBerry devices. Users can also access the service from a PC. The service is also expanding the number of devices with which it works: as of yesterday users of Sonos home audio equipment can also stream their Rdio playlists through their devices. Rdio is a subscription-based music service that is priced at $9.99 per month for the web/mobile edition and $4.99 per month for the web-only version.

Rdio also links up with third parties to develop music experiences, for example powering the music behind the Grammy Awards’ MusicMapper service.

Rdio was launhed in June 2010 with backing from Zennstrom’s and Friis’ own VC outfit Atomico Ventures and competes with services like Spotify and ventures from the labels themselves, such as Qriocity from Sony (NYSE: SNE).

Mangrove has been an investor in a number of European startups including Zennstrom’s and Friis’ Skype, buying clubs Brands4friends and KupiVIP, Nimbuzz and Jolicloud.

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  1. Time for the industry to realise that yet more and more delivery channels of the same poor quality (both musical and reproduction) will not rebuild user appreciation.

    I hope these guys loose there venture capital, and soon.

    Death to the MP3.

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