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Summary:

Even as MySpace (NSDQ: NWS) has floundered in recent years, it’s hung on to an important user base-artists, particularly musicians, who have…

Music Lawsuit
photo: Flickr/The Library of Congress

Even as MySpace (NSDQ: NWS) has floundered in recent years, it’s hung on to an important user base-artists, particularly musicians, who have relied on the site to provide them with a digital home on the web and a place to showcase their work. Now that the site has laid off half its employees, some folks are wondering if the site is in its death throes. If MySpace’s downhill slide continues, where its small but most-important constituency-musicians-will head?

The most logical destination would seem to be the truly dominant social-networking site: Facebook. But Facebook just hasn’t caught on among musicians in the same way MySpace has, at least not yet. And it doesn’t have the same tools to play or discover new music that made MySpace so popular for music fans, even though the latter’s own tools were far from perfect.

Other possible destinations abound, and, unlike during the heydey of MySpace, the web has a bunch of high-quality music services now. Those sites include The Sixty One, Sellaband, Bandcamp, Pledge Music, Tunecore and last.fm. But none of those sites have the userbase of a MySpace or a Facebook. And there’s a question as to whether there are simply too many of them. If it’s about really connecting with users on the web, no band is really going to want to do that at seven different sites. That would create a fractured landscape for fans and musicians alike.

“Ultimately, MySpace is leaving a big hole,” writes musician and ex-Last.fm PR guy Christian Ward. “The site did focus attention, however briefly… Are we going to get lost in all this noise?”

The MySpace phenomenon suggests there’s some desire among musicians to serve a single site where music fans come together. For now, it looks like the online music landscape will be more fragmented. But there’s surely opportunity for a service that can reduce that fragmentation.

  1. http://www.LocalMusicVibe.com –> Local Music Vibe is a network for connecting fans, bands, venues and businesses in a local area. Localmusicvibe.com lets fans easily find shows in their area, and the Weekly Music Shout Out newsletter goes to registered users who want to find out about shows coming soon. Local Music Vibe began in 2008 as a labor of love for husband-and-wife entrepreneurs Dave and Shelley Champine. They loved going out to live shows near their Marin County, California home, and saw a need for a single online source for information on local shows, artists and venues. The website caught on, and in 2009 they expanded the site’s capacity to allow artists and venues anywhere in the world to post their shows and profiles. The network has grown organically, from Marin to the entire San Francisco Bay Area and beyond. Folks have even posted shows as far away as Finland! Add your local music venues and help grow your Local Music Vibe … This is a pretty new website – but really easy to use ! Share this info with your local venues and bands !

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  2. Doesn’t every band have a MySpace page, created in 2005, and last updated in 2005? Technically, you’re not a band unless you have an abandon, spammed MySpace page.

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  3. Some bands do update their MySpace pages, and even promote them in their new album’s liner notes. But I see more bands moving towards their own sites, with more interactive widgets for listening and sharing.

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  4. I think you should be aware of IndabaMusic.com, which is a community of tens of thousands of musicians that can collaborate and record right on the site. It also allows for music publishing.

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  5. You already said it: Facebook. And how do you get music on Facebook?

    BandPage by RootMusic. Duh! RootMusic.com, baby!

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  6. I’m with Cecilia, Rootmusic/Bandpage is where things are headed. People are so focused on Facebook and Twitter at the moment that it would be a serious uphill battle to corral a significant amount of users onto a music based social networking site and keep them logging in regularly. Facebook is where people are and Bandpage is the best way for artists to get the most out of their pages on Facebook.

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  7. Looks to me like a job for Spotify. I get an ear for plenty of new music via Spotify – I have no idea if they are a best selling flavour or some up-start Indie – if I like the feel of it I play it. And if I play it,well, the band automatically earns. Sounds like a win/win to me for all but the soon to be extinct record labels who just wish the world would stand still so they could just carry-on with their coprophagous habits.

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  8. I agree with the comments about about artists moving to having their own web presence but our belief at get-ctrl.com is that the site should feed content automatically to other sites such as Soundcloud or blog sites that get aggregated into sites such as Hype Machine that promote new music to new fans.

    I’m really amazed that so many bands still use mySpace when it has let them down so many times and plaster adverts across everything. We build the get-ctrl platform to address these issues and made it free to use.

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  9. I Sing You Watch Tuesday, January 18, 2011

    i Sing You Watch is a social network website dedicated for the aspiring singers, performer and up and coming artists with great singing talent. Join the fastest growing social network singing community today. It only takes 3 minutes to register. Show us and network your singing talent to the world to view.
    Web: isingyouwatch.com

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  10. The article fails to mention SoundCloud, the best place for artists on the web right now. Close to 3M users.

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