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Summary:

Today’s links pose some good questions about both cloud computing and NoSQL. For cloud computing, the question is about what’s the right blend of old-school and new-school, and for NoSQL it’s whether the next year will bring consolidation, proliferation or both.

question mark

Today’s links pose some good questions about both cloud computing and NoSQL. For cloud computing, the question is about what’s the right blend of old-school and new-school, and for NoSQL it’s whether the next year will bring consolidation, proliferation or both.

The Crossover Cloud (From The Loose Couple’s Blog) This analogy is interesting, but I don’t think I like it. Crossover vehicles seem like the worst of both worlds, which might apply to certain telco clouds, I guess. But cloud is all about being cutting-edge.

NoSQL – Consolidating and Proliferating in 2011 (From Too Much Information) As I noted in an earlier link about Cassandra, I think it will be about commercializing existing projects beyond the current handful of startups. Then comes the consolidation.

Univa Refines Data Center Optimization Strategy (From VMblog) I’m interested to see how Univa furthers its efforts on the product front. Vendors like Univa and Adaptive Computing have compelling cloud technology, but need to make themselves known outside HPC.

ASF Announces Apache Cassandra 0.7 (From the Apache Software Foundation) While other projects have raised a little more money, Cassandra has Apache in its corner. How will that ultimately affect the product ecosystem?

Ovum: Efficiency Will Drive Gov’t Outsourcing, Cloud Use (From NetworkWorld) Seems logical enough, as the U.S. government, in particular, has placed a large emphasis on cloud computing for that very reason.

Image courtesy of Flickr user Stefan Baudy.

For more cloud-related news analysis and research, visit GigaOM Pro.

  1. Thanks for listing “The Crossover Cloud” – the real point of it was to try and highlight the challenge of deploying consistent, repeatable workloads across on premise and off premise capacity. It was based solely on my experience of the last 3 years of building a private cloud and then experimenting with trying to seamlessly move components of that to public providers.

    Thanks again for the listing.

    Christian @ theloosecouple.com

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