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Summary:

The “other” electric sports car company, Fisker Automotive, has bumped up the price of its inaugural vehicle the Fisker Karma — yet again. According to Green Car Reports, the Fisker Karma will now cost $95,900 for the baseline price.

FiskerKarmaprofile

The “other” electric sports car company Fisker Automotive has bumped up the price of its inaugural vehicle, the Fisker Karma, yet again. According to Green Car Reports, the Fisker Karma will now cost $95,900 as the baseline price, and $103,900 and $108,900 for the Eco Sport and Eco Chic lines respectively.

Fisker’s Karma, which is due out in Spring 2011, was originally going to cost around $80,000 when it was first announced in 2008, and that price jumped up to $87,900 shortly there after. Now at close to $100,000 (before subsidies) the Karma has hit the same price range as Tesla’s electric sports car the Roadster. The Karma, like GM’s Volt, is an extended range electric car, which means an engine kicks in after about 50 miles, and then the car can drive for another several hundred miles on gas. Tesla’s Roadster can go around 250 miles on battery power alone.

The Karma is one of the only soon-to-be released electric cars that we haven’t driven for our Green Overdrive show. Fisker is being unusually quiet when it comes to giving test drives and interviews, despite the fact that the company is targeting March and April 2011 for its first deliveries.

There’s been a lot of praise for the aesthetics of the Karma — it’s just a good-looking car, designed by Henrik Fisker, the designer behind the Aston Martin V8 Vantage, Aston Martin DB9 and BMW Z8. But we’ll see if the new price tag gives any potential buyers pause. We’re waiting to hear more back from Fisker on the pricing.

Related content on GigaOM Pro (subscription required):

  1. The Karma will be the first car to offer luxury vehicle buyers a truly responsible alternative. At $88,400 after federal tax incentives, the Karma is within $500 of its originally announced MSRP of $87,900. Local incentives offer additional savings. With an MSRP of $95,900 the Karma is within 10% of the originally announced MSRP of $87,900 announced in 2009 – an incremental change over the course of two years. The Karma starts $19,500 less than a similarly-equipped Tesla Roadster – $20,500 less when you include destination charges. The Karma starts $1,400 less than a Porsche Panamera S (both 400hp) after $7500 federal tax incentives are applied. Local incentives offer additional savings. There is additional value added in design and equipment improvements such as the now-standard integrated solar roof panel, which would have been a $5000 option.

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