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Summary:

After being rebuffed by Groupon, Google is reportedly looking at acquiring another player in the group-buying space — and there are good reasons why it should do so. A marriage of local advertising and social shopping could fill a big hole in the web giant’s portfolio.

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After being turned down by Groupon, despite offering a reported $6 billion for the Chicago-based, group-shopping phenomenon, Google is apparently shopping around for a similar company to buy, according to a report in the New York Post. While the report could be a ploy on the part of some smaller competitors to bump their names to the top of the acquisition list, there are some good reasons for Google to consider doing exactly that. A marriage of local advertising and social shopping could fill a big hole in the web company’s portfolio, if it is handled properly.

The fact that Google was willing to spend as much as $6 billion for Groupon — which would have been almost twice the size of the company’s largest acquisition to date, the $3.1-billion purchase of DoubleClick in 2007 — shows that the search giant knows it has some holes to fill, and was prepared to spend a bundle to do so. Groupon chose to remain independent and continue to scale, which will probably require more funding on top of the $165 million or so it has already raised, but there’s no reason why Google couldn’t accomplish the same things with a smaller competitor.

As I argued when the Google purchase rumors first appeared, putting something like Groupon together with the web giant’s local advertising efforts — as well as its ability to fine-tune algorithms around user behavior — could produce something pretty powerful. Google has been building out its hyper-local advertising efforts through Google Place Pages and other efforts, but such a purchase could take those efforts to a new level. If there’s one thing Groupon has shown, it’s that local merchants are looking for ways to target consumers, and group-buying offers that in a very simple way. (I discussed Groupon in more detail in a recent GigaOM Pro report, subscription required).

So which Groupon competitor should Google buy? Amazon recently funded LivingSocial to the tune of $175 million, so that seems to be an unlikely choice — although theoretically, Google might be able to convince Amazon to sell, it would probably take a substantial premium. Tippr is another social-shopping engine with some potential; the company runs its own group-buying operation, but its primary business is helping retailers and website publishers set up and run their own white-label Groupon-style platforms. That might make for a good fit with Google; just as the company offers the Blogger platform for publishing and Google Apps for businesses, it could theoretically offer Tippr as a service. Also in the running are smaller competitors such as BuyWithMe, HomeRun and SocialBuy.

As more than one critic of Groupon has noted, there aren’t really a lot of barriers to entry in the company’s business, which is why Groupon is spending so heavily to try to get large enough that its scale becomes a competitive advantage. There are only a few companies that can generate that kind of scale easily, and Google is certainly one of them (Amazon, Microsoft, Yahoo and AOL are some of the others who could do this). If the web company does decide to acquire one of the smaller group-buying operators, watching Groupon go head-to-head with Google — and possibly Facebook as well — could make the social-shopping space one of the most interesting battlegrounds of 2011.

Related GigaOM Pro content (sub req’d):

Post and thumbnail photo courtesy of Flickr users Olaf Gradin and Groupon

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  1. Matthew,
    Google will not get approval to buy any of them. And if Google gets into the business itself, LivingSocial will raise a stink (in the washingtonpost) hastening anti-trust inquiry.

    The oxygen of the local deal business is online advertising. Google getting in the business and promoting its own deals over that of others will stick it to the small business owner who just cannot afford the Google Tax on top of everything else.

  2. If Google buys or creates their own ‘groupon’ one thing that they (google) can do is to stop running groupon on on the google ad network.

    1. Exactly what they cannot do. Smacks of AT&T refusing carriage for MCI. Will lead to the breakup of google for sure.

  3. With anti-trust related issues in acquiring other startups, Google should just start their own — bundle it well with their search, gMail, YouTube and run-over groupon in the process.

    1. That’s a good point — although buying something would give Google a head-start, they could easily offer their own group-buying service bundled with other services.

  4. Daily deal sites and group-buying websites are a great way to save on the products and services you need, whether it is groceries or furniture. It is great that they are expanding and growing so that more people can use them. It’s not surprising that Google wants to get in on the trend.

    A great site to use to find the deals and sales in your area is http://www.dailydealpool.com. They’ll send you a daily email with the greatest discounts, ensuring you can save everyday.

  5. I think Google will get better bang for their buck if they go with a smaller Groupon clone… $6 billion was a lot even if Groupon currently is king of the world. There are lots of similar sites out there using pretty much the exact same system. LocalDealSites.com lists over 130 Groupon-like daily deal websites. http://www.localdealsites.com/

  6. Matthew, Google will not get approval to buy any of them. And if Google gets into the business itself, LivingSocial will raise a stink (in the washingtonpost) hastening anti-trust inquiry. The oxygen of the local deal business is online advertising. Google getting in the business and promoting its own deals over that of others will stick it to the small business owner who just cannot afford the Google Tax on top of everything else.

  7. The Rise of the Groupon Wannabes | SiliconANGLE Wednesday, December 22, 2010

    [...] analysis also covers the fact the combination of Google’s advertising efforts and influence with local [...]

  8. I have heard that Google started to work with a small company Adility right after the deal fell through. kind of a groupon clone, but they don’t run their own site, just connect to merchants with a local sales force.

    1. Dailydealmythbuster dailydeal Tuesday, January 4, 2011

      I dont think Google was working with Adility, those are not traditional daily deals. Adility repurposes coupons from Smart circle but the offers are very low end and the customers are hillbillies. Google would never work with them

  9. Groupon Raises $950 Million — Now Comes the Hard Part: Tech News and Analysis « Monday, January 10, 2011

    [...] own local powerhouse from Google Place Pages and Hotpot and so on, there is also a chance that it might acquire one of Groupon’s competitors as [...]

  10. Google could probably acquire one of the companies that sells daily deal sites like DailyDealBuilder, DealCurrent, or BringLocal for a much lower cost.

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