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Summary:

After two years, Dropbox, one of our favorite file sharing tools, has reached a new level of maturity with version 1.0, a major update that includes a host of fixes and improvements and allows Drobox to come out of beta.

Screen shot 2010-12-17 at 5.17.29 AM

After two years, Dropbox, one of our favorite file sharing tools, has reached a level of maturity with version 1.0, an update that includes brings a host of fixes and improvements allowing Dropbox to lose its beta status. Dropbox said the update represents a big milestone for the software as it strives to become an everyday syncing tool for people.

Here’s a look at the upgrades:

  • The best new feature arguably is selective sync, which allows users to choose which folders can downloaded to which computers. This should save time and also storage space on different devices, particularly with mobile devices that may need some, not all, of a user’s Dropbox files.
  • Dropbox 1.0 is much leaner, faster and has been rewritten to optimize response time, scale and resource consumption. The latest version reduces memory usage by up to 50 percent, according to the company.
  • The set-up process has been redesigned on all platforms to make it easier to get started. Dropbox re-wrote preference menus and built the Mac OS X version in Cocoa so it’s a 20 percent smaller download and looks more like a native Mac app.
  • There are hundreds of bug fixes and changes to extended attribute sync, which should help syncing on Macs.

Altogether, it’s a nice set of upgrades that should help Dropbox continue its momentum and encourage more people to share files online. Check it out here.

Related content from GigaOM Pro (sub. req.):

From GigaOM.tv: Dropbox co-founder Drew Houston

  1. I love DropBox but the cost of sharing through DropBox has been holding me back. At $200 per year for 100G it is pretty pricey. File sharing functionality is perfect but cloud storage features should also include back up. So I recently found Trend Micro Safe Sync: for $60 per year for unlimited storage you get back up and file sharing functionality. You don’t get the wonderful P2P features of DropBox, but as far as a paying customer is concerned I switched over.

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  2. Yeah, I love Dropbox, but the pricing model is just too high to justify at this point. If they’d add an unlimited plan, while reducing the prices of their 50 and 100gb plans, I’d be on board. Though, I’m sure that’s coming now with the 1.0 release. I hope.

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  3. Like you, it’s one of my favorite apps. It acts a mini file server for me. However, it still lacks two key features.

    1. open in – on the iPhone and iPad so if a file comes in via email you can save it to drop box

    2. Send via email – be able to send a file directly from within DropBox but rather than as link as an attachment if you need to.

    Other than that it rocks for me!

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  4. I’d be happy paying $30 a year for the free version. I use if to move code and documents so I hardly touch a few percent of the free version’s cap.

    Part of me wants to upgrade to more storage than I need just so they can get some cash.

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  5. I’d be happy paying $30 a year for the free version. I use it to move code and documents so I hardly touch a few percent of the free version’s cap.

    Part of me wants to upgrade to more storage than I need just so they can get some cash.

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  6. I’ve been an avid Sugarsync user for awhile, and I’m trying to figure out what Dropbox can do that Sugarsync can’t do? Dropbox gets so much more pub it seems, I have to be missing something right? Legit question here, not trying to be sarcastic…

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  7. [...] Dropbox. Share a folder or nested folders containing important documents using a company Dropbox. We covered the launch of Dropbox 1.0 recently. [...]

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