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Summary:

Join James, Matt and Kevin live for this week’s audio podcast where they’ll cover this week’s mobile technology news and share experiences with the latest software, hardware and web services. If you missed the live show, you can grab an MP3 audio recording of the show.

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CLICK HERE to download the file and listen directly.
MoTR 225 is 66 minutes long and is a 61 MB file in MP3 format.

HOSTS: James Kendrick (Houston), Matthew Miller (Seattle) and Kevin C. Tofel (Philadelphia)

TOPICS:

  • Google Books comes to Android and iOS
  • Thoughts on the Samsung Nexus S
  • Matt joined James and bought a Samsung Galaxy Tab (Kevin was debating it but there’s a big reason why he isn’t: app lock in costs)
  • Freeware: Angry Birds Seasons Edition. Angry Birds Day is today
  • Changing fonts on Android rooted phones: free app called Type Fresh
  • Google Chrome OS and CR-48 laptops
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  1. This is bad timing given that CES is going on, but I wanted to post this question while it was on my mind…

    Kevin and Matt, I recently listened to this podcast and your discussion of Google Books, Kindle and Nook. I was hoping to hear your thoughts on the lack of ePub support on the Kindle. I recently purchased an ereader to give as a Christmas gift. Although the current Kindle is an attractive device and I find the navigation on the Nook a bit bothersome, I bought the Nook based on its support for ePub (with and without DRM). I cannot imagine buying a single-purpose device like an e-ink ereader only to be locked into a proprietary format. And while it is nice that Amazon has a Kindle app on a variety of devices (none of which use e-ink), that doesn’t help much when one (in the future, perhaps,) wants to move to a different e-ink reader like the Sony Reader, Nook, the reader from Kobo, etc. That seems like an intentional business decision on Amazon’s part to force Kindle users to purchase books from them rather than other ebook retailers. I may be mistaken, but Amazon is alone in that practice among e-ink device makers/sellers. Your thoughts?

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